Honolulu Museum of Art

Honolulu Museum of Art HoMA includes a museum, Art School, Café, Coffee Bar, and Shop.

Hawai‘i's culture hub dedicated to creating relevant and transformative experiences through the study, preservation, presentation and creation of art.

At the entrance of the exhibition "Forward Together: African American Prints from the Jean and Robert Steele Collection,...
02/17/2024

At the entrance of the exhibition "Forward Together: African American Prints from the Jean and Robert Steele Collection," a lively greeting from Faith Ringgold's "Mama Can Sing" and "Papa Can Blow" invites you in.

The striking works, with their bright colors and intense blacks, kick off a common through line in the Steele Collection: jazz 🎶🎷. And music can have powerful resonance for people.

"I have a deep personal connection with this print for many reasons," says HoMA Assistant Registrar Schamarra Smith about “Papa Can Blow.” "However, the most prominent feeling it evokes in me is the memory of my great-grandfather, whom we all affectionately called Papa."

"I was fortunate enough to have grown up with my great-grandparents, and I remember Papa's love for music. Despite being unable to read a note, he could play the saxophone like a pro. When he played, it was as if he was singing from his soul."
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Faith Ringgold (American, born 1930) [Left] "Papa Can Blow," 2005. Screenprint. Experimental Printmaking Institute (EPI), Lafayette College, Easton, PA. Partial gift of Robert and Jean Steele; partial purchase with funds from the John V. Levas Trust, 2023 (2023-06-45). [Right] "Mama Can Sing," 2004. Screenprint. Experimental Printmaking Institute (EPI), Lafayette College, Easton, PA. Partial gift of Robert and Jean Steele; partial purchase with funds from the John V. Levas Trust, 2023 (2023-06-43).

HoMA was thrilled to welcome cartoonist Robb Armstrong and his wife Crystal Armstrong to see "Forward Together: African ...
02/16/2024

HoMA was thrilled to welcome cartoonist Robb Armstrong and his wife Crystal Armstrong to see "Forward Together: African American Prints from the Jean and Robert Steele Collection," and meet Trustee Robert Steele. Robb is currently artist in residence at 'Iolani School. HoMA's Catherine Whitney and Katherine Love, who curated the exhibition, gave the Armstrongs and ‘Iolani School art teacher Beth Riley a tour of the show.

Cool fact: Robb was a protegé of Peanuts creator Charles Schulz. In 1994, Schulz asked Robb if he could give the character Franklin (originally created in 1968) the last name of Armstrong in Robb's honor. (It is mentioned in the Peanuts special "You're in the Super Bowl, Charlie Brown.)

And today, Apple TV airs "Snoopy Presents: Welcome Home, Franklin", the Franklin Armstrong origin story. Robb wrote the script along with Charles Schulz's son Craig and grandson Bryan.

Pictured left to right: Crystal Armstrong, Beth Riley, Robb Armstrong, Catherine Whitney, Christine Boutros and Robert Steele.

When you look at David Hockney’s portraits, you get intimate glimpses of the artist's inner circle. Best friends and lov...
02/16/2024

When you look at David Hockney’s portraits, you get intimate glimpses of the artist's inner circle. Best friends and lovers, parents and siblings, curators and fellow artists—the deep connections he's made throughout his life are preserved in his expert renderings of human figures.(“The Guardian” says no one can draw from life better than Hockney.)

In this row of portraits in "David Hockney: Perspective Must Be Reversed," on view through March 10, you'll spot Hockney’s brother, sister, and longtime partner Jean-Pierre Gonçalves de Lima (can you guess who's who?). Explore the exhibition further and some names will start becoming recognizable, such as textile designer—and one of the artist's favorite models—Celia Birtwell.

It's this familiarity that Hockney often shares with his sitters, as well as his careful observations, that allows him to capture inner moods and subtle expressions, letting the models' personalities shine through.
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David Hockney (British, b. 1937) From left to right:
[1] "Margaret Hockney," 2008. Inkjet printed computer drawing on paper, ed. 9/12. Published by David Hockney, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer.
[2] "Matelot Kevin Druez I," 2009. Inkjet printed computer drawing on paper, ed. 25/30. Published by David Hockney, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer.
[3] "A Bigger Jean-Pierre Gonçalves de Lima," 2008. Inkjet printed computer drawing on paper, mounted on Dibond, ed. 7/12. Published by David Hockney, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer.
[4] "Paul Hockney 2," 2009. Inkjet printed computer drawing on paper, ed. 11/12. Published by David Hockney, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer.
[5] "Michele and John Spike," 2008. Inkjet printed computer drawing on paper, ed. 11/12. Published by David Hockney, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer.

In Hawai‘i, Feb 14 marks more than Saint Valentine. On that day in 1779, a confrontation broke out after British explore...
02/15/2024

In Hawai‘i, Feb 14 marks more than Saint Valentine. On that day in 1779, a confrontation broke out after British explorer and cartographer Captain James Cook attempted to take Kalani‘ōpu‘u, aliʻi nui of Hawai‘i Island, hostage for the return of a stolen skiff.

The print above by John Clevery—on view through Aug 4 in the exhibition "Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of Hawaiian Nationhood"—depicts the moment before Cook was killed at Kealakekua Bay. The scene is based on the account by the British marine artist’s brother James, who was a carpenter aboard the HMS Resolution (one of the two naval ships under Cook's command).

Concerning the foreigners who came after Captain Cook, historian Samuel Mānaiakalani Kamakau, wrote, “He mau manuā a he mau moku huli ‘āina ka nui o nā moku i kū mua mai ma Hawai‘i nei, a he mau moku hoa aloha, a he moku pepehi kanaka a pepehi aupuni nō ho‘i kekahi o ia po‘e moku.” (Most of the first ships to land here, in Hawai‘i, were warships and exploring vessels. There were friendly ships, but there were also ships that were deadly to man and nation.)

Interested in learning more about the history of Hawai‘i after exploring the exhibition? You can find the publication that inspired the show at the HoMA Shop.

About the exhibition: "Ke Kumu Aupuni" takes its name from the book of the same name, published by . On view are prints, drawings and paintings that appear in the bilingual chronicle. The visual accounts of key moments in Hawaiian history take on much different meanings today than when they were created in the 18th century.
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John Cleverly (British, 1747–1786). “View of Owhyhee (Hawai‘i), from Views in the South Seas,” 1787–1788. Hand-colored aquatint. Gift of Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, 2015 (2015-50-01).

A visit to HoMA is the best Valentine’s Day experience 🖼💖. How so?1️⃣ The awe-inspiring works! From Kapulani Landgraf's ...
02/14/2024

A visit to HoMA is the best Valentine’s Day experience 🖼💖. How so?

1️⃣ The awe-inspiring works! From Kapulani Landgraf's "‘Au‘a" (that’s 'The Oval' star Daniel Croix and producer Mele Hamasaki exploring the show) and Claude Monet's romantic "Water Lilies" to the Japanese screens and scrolls depicting the many romantic escapades in "The Tale of Genji," you can spend hours strolling the galleries.
2️⃣ There's no need to leave the museum to dine and shop for an i-luv-you memento. Talk about convenience 🙌.
3️⃣ Bauhaus, calotype, intaglio, kinetic art—these are just some of the art terms you can use to impress a date or bestie. We got you covered in all the heart-shaped ways!

Bring on the Year of the Dragon! 🐉✨ Look for these lucky, powerful creatures in our galleries as you celebrate the   at ...
02/11/2024

Bring on the Year of the Dragon! 🐉✨ Look for these lucky, powerful creatures in our galleries as you celebrate the at HoMA.

Along with dragons, the above robes are embroidered with other symbols of good fortune, such as pearls, bats, and birds. The stylized waves and mountains at the hem signify longevity.

PLUS: Don’t miss this week’s arrangements by the museum volunteer Flower Team that celebrate the Lunar New Year!
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[1–3] Woman’s Ceremonial Robe. China, late 19th to early 20th century. Gilt and silk yarn embroidered on silk satin with gilt buttons. Gift of Sybil K. Paris (Mrs. Irvine Paris), 1994 (7969.1) [4] Coat for a Female Official. China, late Qing dynasty, 19th century. Gilt and silk yarn embroidered on silk satin with gilt buttons. Gift of Alma McPherson, 1979. (4803.1)

On view through Aug 4 is “Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of a Hawaiian Nationhood.” In celebration of Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawa...
02/09/2024

On view through Aug 4 is “Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of a Hawaiian Nationhood.” In celebration of Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi (Hawaiian Language Month), learn more about this new exhibition below in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi and English ↓

Ho‘omaika‘i akula kēia hō‘ike i ka puke hou ‘o “Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of Hawaiian Nationhood” (Awaiaulu 2022) a ho‘okahua ihola i kahi e kikilo maika‘i ai i kekahi o nā ki‘i mua loa o Hawai‘i nei a ka po‘e kaha ki‘i ‘Eulopa i hana ai.

Ua koho ‘ia kēia mau ki‘i mai ka waihona mai o HoMA e kīnohinohi a ho‘ākāka i kēia puke leolua me kona mo‘olelo no ke ola o Kamehameha I (1736–1819), Ka Na‘i Aupuni, nāna i ho‘ohui i nā moku i Aupuni Hawai‘i i ka makahiki 1810, me ka mo‘olelo o kāna keiki a ho‘oilina mō‘ī, Kamehameha II (1797–1824). Ua kākau a ho‘olaha ‘ia aku ka mo‘olelo ma ka ‘ōlelo ‘ōiwi e Samuel Mānaiakalani Kamakau (1815–1876), ma ke ka‘ina ‘atikala o nā p**e pākahi i ka Nupepa kuokoa mai ka makahiki 1866 a i ka 1868.
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This exhibition celebrates the recently published “Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of Hawaiian Nationhood” (Awaiaulu, 2022) and offers a closer look at some of the earliest images of Hawai‘i by European artists.

These works from HoMA’s collection illustrate this bilingual chronicle of the life and reign of Kamehameha I (1736–1819), “The Conqueror,” who united the Hawaiian Islands as the Kingdom of Hawai‘i in 1810, and his son and successor Kamehameha II (1797–1824). Originally written in ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i by Samuel Mānaiakalani Kamakau (1815–1876), “Ke Kumu Aupuni” was serialized in the Hawaiian language newspaper “Ka Nupepa Kuokoa” between 1866 and 1868.

Mahalo for the translation.
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Louis Choris (Russian, 1795–1828). "Tammeamea (Kamehameha)," 1816. Watercolor, ink, and wash on paper. Purchase, 2005 (28203).

We asked for photos of you in aloha wear—and you've come through! Catch a glimpse of a few of the submissions we've rece...
02/07/2024

We asked for photos of you in aloha wear—and you've come through! Catch a glimpse of a few of the submissions we've received so far. Can you spot yours?

Mahalo 🙌 to everyone who's submitted photographs, new and old. We can't wait to show them off in the exhibition "Fashioning Aloha" when it opens April 12, highlighting aloha wear's place in our community.

There's still time to send in pictures of you and loved ones in holokū, mu‘umu‘u, holomu‘u and aloha shirts! Email [email protected] by Feb 23 to see your photos displayed at the museum. Learn more: https://bit.ly/493UvYb

Taking a photo of someone taking a photo of someone using the phone in front of a print of a many-sided man using the ph...
02/04/2024

Taking a photo of someone taking a photo of someone using the phone in front of a print of a many-sided man using the phone.

Who is the topsy-turvy thinker deep in conversation in the print? It's the longtime friend of Hockney and master printmaker Kenneth Tyler, who collaborated with the artist on several series, including "Moving Focus" (which the above lithograph is a part of).

The working relationship between the two began soon after Hockney made the move to California. It blossomed, with Hockney and Tyler collaborating for decades, thanks to the creative freedom the printmaker offered the artists he worked with. "With Ken Tyler, nothing was impossible," Hockney remarked. "If I said, 'could we?', he said 'yes, yes, it can be done.'"

(📸: + .jk on Instagram)

02/03/2024

It's an honor to be an exhibition partner with every three years. And we’re excited to share its big reveal! 📢

The Hawai‘i Triennial 2025 (HT25) theme is (drum roll 🥁): ALOHA NŌ!

More than an ubiquitous Hawaiian greeting, aloha is an action that embodies profound love and truth—telling, a practice that has been kept and cared for by the people of Hawaiʻi for generations, fostering deep connections to the ʻāina (land), environment, elements, and each other ✨. Reclaiming aloha as an active cultural practice, HT25 explores contemporary art from Hawai‘i, thePacific, and beyond, inviting you on a journey of radical love and positive change.

🗓️ Save the dates: Feb 15–May 4, 2025
📍 O‘ahu | Maui | Hawai‘i Island
✨ Curated by Wassan Al-Khudhairi, Binna Choi, and Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu

👉🏼 Join their Art Summit 2024, June 13–15, in Honolulu, a thematic precursor to HT25, which will examine ALOHA NŌ through a series of discussions, workshops, and screenings featuring artists, curators, and culture bearers from Hawai‘i, the Pacific, and the world.

Read the full announcement: hawaiicontemporary.org

Punahou Carnival is just around the corner—here's our prediction for this weekend's weather 🌧.See this woodblock print, ...
02/01/2024

Punahou Carnival is just around the corner—here's our prediction for this weekend's weather 🌧.

See this woodblock print, as well as others that showcase Utagawa Toyoharu's mastery of Western one-point perspective techniques, in "Floating Pictures: Landscapes by Utagawa Toyoharu" before it closes Feb 18.
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Utagawa Toyoharu (1735–1814). "The Tang Gate at the Palace of the Dragon King" from the series "Newly Published Perspective Pictures." Japan, Edo period (1615–1868), c. 1770s–1780s. Woodblock print; ink and color on paper. Gift of James A. Michener, 1973 (16490).

02/01/2024

Well, what do we have here? 🦎 Just a preview of what you'll see at the next HoMA Cross Currents.

Journey through the museum with Kanaka Maoli artist and writer Kalilinoe Detwiler, who uses spoken word and animation—like the one below referencing Jules Tavernier's "View of the Pali"—to shine new light on select artworks in the galleries and prompt art discussions. Hello mo‘o!

The first session is sold out, but Kalilinoe returns for a repeat Cross Currents experience on Feb 17. Register here: https://bit.ly/3Oq2lTS

  we remember the crew of the space shuttle Challenger, which—along with Hawai‘i island’s Ellison Onizuka (the first Asi...
01/29/2024

we remember the crew of the space shuttle Challenger, which—along with Hawai‘i island’s Ellison Onizuka (the first Asian American astronaut) and Judy Resnik (the first Jewish American astronaut)—included Ron McNair, America’s second Black astronaut and the first person to play a musical instrument in space. 🎶🎷.

Learn more about Ronald McNair’s inspiring journey of overcoming obstacles and fulfilling his dreams, as well as the stories of other trailblazing Black astronauts, on Feb 1 as we open the Honolulu African American Film Festival with the Hawai‘i premiere of “The Space Race.”

There will be a tribute to the Challenger and its crew during the reception. Ronald’s brother, Carl McNair, will also join us for a post-screening discussion moderated by Zephanii Smith Eisenstat.

Get tickets here: https://bit.ly/3SCyr1u

01/27/2024

The Honolulu African American Film Festival (HAAFF) returns for its 13th year! Celebrate Black History Month with nine great films (plus a program of six shorts) highlighting up-and-coming talent and important annals of Black history.

The festival kicks off Feb 1 with an opening reception that includes a live performance by jazz duo Sound Fire (comprised of saxophonist Jason Gay and The Voice alumnus Mycle Wastman), A Jamaican buffet dinner by chef Damon of R Jawaiian jerk, a cash bar and the Hawai‘i premiere of "The Space Race." This moving documentary tells the stories of NASA’s pioneering Black astronauts, including Ed Dwight, Ronald McNair, Guion Bluford and Charles Bolden. McNair's brother, author Carl McNair, will speak after the screening! Get tickets here: https://bit.ly/3SCyr1u

Explore the festival lineup here: https://bit.ly/3SbpxXf

Presented in collaboration with the Honolulu African American Film Festival committee: Daphne Barbee-Wooten, Ethan Caldwell, Akiemi Glenn, Tadia Rice, Sandra Simms, and Sharon Yarbrough.

🗣 New exhibition alert! "Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of Hawaiian Nationhood" opens Feb 1, offering a closer look at t...
01/26/2024

🗣 New exhibition alert! "Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of Hawaiian Nationhood" opens Feb 1, offering a closer look at the complex context around early images of Hawai‘i.

See 30 prints, drawings, and paintings by European artists from three naval voyages to Hawai‘i during the 18th and 19th centuries. On the surface the works are fascinating visual accounts, but the events and portraits were documented with a Western lens, making them as layered and fraught as the history they contributed.

The works are from HoMA's collection and appear in the publication "Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of Hawaiian Nationhood" by Samuel Mānaiakalani Kamakau (1815–1876). This bilingual chronicle in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi and English, published by Awaiaulu, Inc. in 2022, follows the life and reign of Kamehameha I and Kamehameha II.

Pictured below are O‘ahu Governor and High Chief Boki and his wife Chiefess Liliha. The couple, dressed in traditional Hawaiian regalia, posed for John Hayter—an official royal painter to Queen Victoria—when they accompanied King Kamehameha II to London.
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John Hayter (British, 1800–1895). "Boki-Governor of Wahu (O‘ahu) of the Sandwich Islands and wife, Liliha," 1825. Color lithograph. Gift of Mrs. Philip E. Spalding, 1941 (11569).

Get the band 🎷 together—there’s a new exhibition to explore with friends at HoMA!"Forward Together: African American Pri...
01/24/2024

Get the band 🎷 together—there’s a new exhibition to explore with friends at HoMA!

"Forward Together: African American Prints from the Jean and Robert Steele Collection" is now on view through Sept 15, marking the public debut of the museum’s recent collection-altering gift. Presented in two rotations, the exhibition features more than 50 prints by 25 renowned African American artists to provide a dynamic snapshot of printmaking across four decades.

A common theme throughout the show is jazz, as seen below in "Wynton’s Tune" by Faith Ringgold. (Sax master Dexter Gordon also makes an appearance in a print by Barkley Hendricks.) For the Harlem-born artist whose childhood friends include the influential saxophonist Sonny Rollins, jazz has long been a source of creative inspiration. “I could easily spend the rest of my life singing my song in pictures,” Ringgold once told The New Yorker.
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Faith Ringgold (American, b. 1930). "Wynton’s Tune," 2004. Screenprint. Partial gift of Robert and Jean Steele; partial purchase with funds from the John V. Levas Trust, 2023 (2023-06-04). © 2023 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York.

Curious about what you'll find when "Fashioning Aloha" opens April 12? Here's a small preview 😉.The exhibition traces th...
01/20/2024

Curious about what you'll find when "Fashioning Aloha" opens April 12? Here's a small preview 😉.

The exhibition traces the evolution of aloha wear and showcases the diversity and inspiration of the design motifs found in the attire. And ✨you✨ can be part of the exhibition. Find out how here: https://bit.ly/493UvYb

"We Are Not American He Hawaiʻi Mau a Mau."These words echo throughout "Kapulani Landgraf: ʻAuʻa," appearing over the ph...
01/18/2024

"We Are Not American He Hawaiʻi Mau a Mau."

These words echo throughout "Kapulani Landgraf: ʻAuʻa," appearing over the photographic portraits of 108 Kanaka ʻŌiwi community leaders. The exhibition opens today, 131 years since the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom.

For this installation of "‘Au‘a," Landgraf created a new sculptural element that protects the photographic works in place of a typical institutional barrier. The chains are made from nylon zip ties passed through na‘au and dried, and the links bear the names of kūpuna (ancestors) given to the artist by participants in the project.

"‘Au‘a" is now on view in Gallery 12 until Sep 15.
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Kapulani Landgraf (b. 1966. Kānaka ‘Ōiwi. Lives and works in Pū‘ahu‘ula, Kāne‘ohe, Ko‘olau Poko, O‘ahu.)

"‘Au‘a," 2019. 108 black-and-white digital photographs, mele hula ‘Au‘a ‘ia performed by Kaleo Trinidada and Aaron J. Salā, 1993 speech of Haunani-Kay Trask courtesy of Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina. Honolulu Museum of Art (2019-7-01).

"Pili Ma Nā Kūpuna," 2023. Nylon zip ties, pig na‘au, marker. Courtesy of the artist.

In observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we share this work by Jacob Lawrence. It depicts the abolitionist Harriet T...
01/15/2024

In observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we share this work by Jacob Lawrence. It depicts the abolitionist Harriet Tubman guiding a group of Civil War-era freedom seekers through a treacherous journey north via the Underground Railroad. It highlights the drive to move communities forward in a spirit of social action and shared responsibility, a profound message in these times.

See this work in the exhibition "Forward Together: African American Prints from the Jean and Robert Steele Collection," on view Jan 18 to Sep 15. Learn more: https://bit.ly/47BjgJV
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Jacob Lawrence (American, 1917–2000). "Forward Together," 1997. Screenprint. Partial gift of Robert and Jean Steele; partial purchase with funds from the John V. Levas Trust, 2023 (2023-06-06). © 2023 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Opening on Jan 17—the anniversary of the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom—is "Kapulani Landgraf: ʻAuʻa." The insta...
01/11/2024

Opening on Jan 17—the anniversary of the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom—is "Kapulani Landgraf: ʻAuʻa." The installation features large photographic portraits of 108 Kanaka ‘Ōiwi community leaders, including Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask (pictured above).

In 1993, Trask spoke to more than 10,000 people gathered on the grounds of ‘Iolani Palace for the Onipaʻa Peace March, an event commemorating the 100th anniversary of the overthrow. "We are not American. We are not American. We are not American," Trask declared.

These words reverberate throughout the installation, with "We Are Not American He Hawai‘i Mau ā Mau" overlaid on each portrait. Accompanying the work are recordings of Trask’s speech and the traditional mele hula "‘Au‘a ‘ia e k**a i kona moku," which will echo in the gallery.

A monthly series of free talks and demonstrations starts Sunday, Feb. 18 with Community Voices: Kū I Ka Mana, featuring Dr. Jonathan Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio and Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Ososrio. Mahalo to Kamehameha Schools for its support of this program.

Find this powerful installation in Gallery 12, on view Jan 17–Sep 15.
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Kapulani Landgraf (b. 1966. Kānaka ‘Ōiwi. Lives and works in Pū‘ahu‘ula, Kāne‘ohe, Ko‘olau Poko, O‘ahu). Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask, detail from "‘Au‘a," 2019. 108 black-and-white digital photographs, sound elements, speech transcript in binder. Honolulu Museum of Art (2019-7-01).

You're invited to be part of a Honolulu Museum of Art exhibition!In April, HoMA presents "Fashioning Aloha," an exhibiti...
01/10/2024

You're invited to be part of a Honolulu Museum of Art exhibition!

In April, HoMA presents "Fashioning Aloha," an exhibition that explores the history, design motifs, and entrepreneurial stories of aloha wear. In the exhibition we want to share how aloha wear has played a role in the community.

Send us photos of you, family, and friends dressed in mu‘umu‘u, holokū, holomu‘u and aloha shirts (beginning in 1935 up to the present), and the images will be displayed in a slideshow on a monitor in the exhibition. Get that favorite photo of grandma in her classic mu‘umu‘u!

Email your photos to: [email protected]

Include as much background information as you can remember—who is in the picture, the year, and the location. Adding the brand of the aloha wear is a bonus! If the garment is homemade, even better!

Submission deadline: Friday, February 23

Make 2024 your best year yet, and jot down the following activities in your new planner:▴ Enjoy the return of HoMA's Bol...
01/04/2024

Make 2024 your best year yet, and jot down the following activities in your new planner:

▴ Enjoy the return of HoMA's Bollywood and South Asia Film Festival at tomorrow night's opening reception, complete with a live performance, a buffet dinner, a cash bar and the Hawai‘i premiere of Varun Grover’s "All India Rank." Producer Sarita Patil will attend the screenings on Jan 4 & 5. Snag opening reception tickets here: https://bit.ly/3S4kxoh
▴ Activate your senses with Lauren Hana Chai's vibrant multimedia work before "Lauren Hana Chai: The Five Senses" closes on Sunday, Jan 14.
▴ Through more than 100 prints spanning six decades, see how David Hockney upends the conventions of linear perspective in "David Hockney: Perspective Should Be Reversed." Open through March 10.
▴ Get insight into our special exhibitions, permanent collections, or striking outdoor spaces by joining a HoMA tour! Free with museum admission.

Happy new year from all of us at HoMA! 🥳🎉 As we get closer to our centennial (only three years away!), we can't help but...
01/01/2024

Happy new year from all of us at HoMA! 🥳🎉 As we get closer to our centennial (only three years away!), we can't help but imagine what our next 100 years as part of Hawai‘i’s cultural landscape will look like.

The museum is closed today for New Year's Day. We'll welcome our first visitors of the year on Wednesday, Jan 3!

Come see "David Hockney: Perspective Should Be Reversed" (open through March 10), and maybe you'll find your own fashion...
12/27/2023

Come see "David Hockney: Perspective Should Be Reversed" (open through March 10), and maybe you'll find your own fashion twin. 🤵

Ho-Ho-HoMA wishes you and your ‘ohana a wonderful holiday season 🎄✨.The museum is closed today for Christmas, but we'll ...
12/25/2023

Ho-Ho-HoMA wishes you and your ‘ohana a wonderful holiday season 🎄✨.

The museum is closed today for Christmas, but we'll be back on Wednesday. For those curious about our hours for the coming week, here's what to know:

📌 Dec 27, 28, 31: 10am–6pm
📌 Dec 29, 30: 10am–9pm
📌 Jan 1, 2: CLOSED

Impress family over the holidays by taking them to HoMA Cafe for lunch or dinner! ✨Sink your teeth into a 12-ounce steak...
12/22/2023

Impress family over the holidays by taking them to HoMA Cafe for lunch or dinner! ✨

Sink your teeth into a 12-ounce steak au jus served with garlic purée, sautéed green beans and carrots, and horseradish. There are also two special drinks to fill you with cheer—a cran-Rosemarie spritzer along with mulled wine that pairs perfectly with the chocolate walnut torte.

This holiday special is only available through Dec 31—hurry before it's gone! 🏃‍♂️ Reserve a table here: https://bit.ly/4ap0Kai

🍽 HoMA Cafe is open for dinner on Fridays and Saturdays from 5pm–8:30pm (food is served until 7:30pm).

On view in "Lauren Hana Chai: The Five Senses" is an epic work called "Souls in Motion 11." "It was on my studio wall, a...
12/19/2023

On view in "Lauren Hana Chai: The Five Senses" is an epic work called "Souls in Motion 11." "It was on my studio wall, a big, blank white canvas, and I had planned to do the painting over a year or so and take my time," Chai says about the painting. When museum director (and exhibition co-curator) Halona Norton-Westbrook did a studio visit, she asked Chai about it. "I showed her the sketch and she said, oh we’re having this for the show. So I got to working and finished it in six months instead. I had taken a break from painting for a year, it went away from me, I was just getting it back. But everything flowed. It was perfect timing."

While Chai was working on the painting, she learned she was pregnant and painted in the addition to her self-portrait at the center. HoMA is tickled to learn from the artist that baby Nova entered the world on Dec. 15, while the exhibition is on view.

Jan. 14 is your last day to see baby Nova’s first portrait!
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Lauren Hana Chai (b. 1991, Hawaiʻi)⁠. "Souls in Motion 11," 2023. Oil and mixed media on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.

What it feels like to wake up to 68-degree weather in Hawai‘i.__Utagawa Kunisada/Toyokuni III (Japanese, 1786–1865). "Wi...
12/18/2023

What it feels like to wake up to 68-degree weather in Hawai‘i.
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Utagawa Kunisada/Toyokuni III (Japanese, 1786–1865). "Winter Moon at Machichiyama," c. 1830–1844. Woodblock print (Nishiki-e); ink and color on paper. Purchase, 1927 (05085).

Give the gift of endless inspiration ✨🎁 with a HoMA membership! With this thoughtful present, the art lover in your life...
12/15/2023

Give the gift of endless inspiration ✨🎁 with a HoMA membership! With this thoughtful present, the art lover in your life can enjoy a year of unlimited visits, skipping lines, and discounts at the Art School and Doris Duke Theatre.

But that's not all! By purchasing a HoMA membership, you give to your community—the support allows us to continue inspiring and uplifting everyone through transformative art experiences. It's your philanthropy that makes everything from events like free Family Sunday to the drop-in art studio on Friday nights to exhibitions like "David Hockney: Perspective Should Be Reversed" possible 🤗.

Elevate your gift-giving and offer a pleasant surprise to those you love here: https://bit.ly/47UJ44F

You gnome you want to 😉🎄.

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