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Society for Indian Music and Arts

Society for Indian Music and Arts The Society for Indian Music and Arts (SIMA) is an organization dedicated to the sustenance and propagation of traditional performing arts of South Asia.

Founded in 2014 by a group of Indian music enthusiasts in State College, PA, the Society for Indian Music and Arts (SIMA) focuses on the sustenance and propagation of traditional performing arts of South Asia. Its primary mission is to achieve this goal by offering a combination of classes, lecture demonstrations, workshops and concerts. SIMA actively supports students of music in the State Colleg

Founded in 2014 by a group of Indian music enthusiasts in State College, PA, the Society for Indian Music and Arts (SIMA) focuses on the sustenance and propagation of traditional performing arts of South Asia. Its primary mission is to achieve this goal by offering a combination of classes, lecture demonstrations, workshops and concerts. SIMA actively supports students of music in the State Colleg

Operating as usual

02/10/2022

Renditions of Ragas Bhimpalasi and Bhupali by Kishan Patel and Akhil Jobanputra from Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

Videography: Lens Guys Studios

02/09/2022

Renditions of Ragas Bihag and Puriya Dhanashri by Kishan Patel from Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

Videography: Lens Guys Studios

02/08/2022

Tejas Tope’s tabla solos in Rupak, Tintala, and Ektala for Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

Videography: Lens Guys Studios

02/07/2022

Performances of Ragas Marva and Nayaki Kanada by Akhil Jobanputra at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

Videography: Lens Guys Studios

02/06/2022

Pratyush Goberdhan's rendition of Raga Gavati at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg's Holiday Baithak is now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

Videography: Lens Guys Studios

02/05/2022

Performances of Ragas Jhinjhoti and Gunkali by Arijit Mahalanabis at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg's Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

Videography: Lens Guys Studios

02/03/2022

On Sarasvati Puja day, we’ll be uploading performances from our holiday baithak which took place at the Harrisburg branch. Featuring a variety of Hindustani vocal and instrumental presentations, this three-day festival inaugurated concert programming at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg.

Join us for daily uploads from February 5-10 on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

February 5: Arijit Mahalanabis (Hindustani vocal - Khayal)
February 6: Pratyush Goberdhan (Hindustani instrumental - Sarangi)
February 7: Akhil Jobanputra (Hindustani vocal - Khayal)
February 8: Tejas Tope (Hindustani instrumental - Tabla)
February 9: Kishan Patel (Hindustani vocal - Khayal)
February 10: Kishan Patel & Akhil Jobanputra (Hindustani vocal - Khayal)

Videography: Lens Guys Studios

10/19/2021

Join us for the Rituchakra Virtual Premiere, taking place on October 21, 2021 at 7.00pm EST on our YouTube channel: youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh

'Rituchakra: A Musical Journey through the Seasons', presented live on October 13, 2019 at The State Theatre, follows the adventures of Lālī, a little girl in a small village in India, as she sets out to find and return the happiness of her village, which was stolen by the six seasons. This unique student production features a beautiful melange of original music, dance, story-telling, and art work, performed by student artists from SIMA and Nritya, and by well-known visiting artists from India.

The livestreaming of day 2 (Prahlada Charitham followed by Q and A session) is now available for viewing here:https://ww...
08/29/2021
Decoding Kathakali - The Artful Storytellers (Day 2)

The livestreaming of day 2 (Prahlada Charitham followed by Q and A session) is now available for viewing here:

https://www.viewcy.com/e/decoding_kathakali__5

Purchasing a ticket once from any of the event pages will give you access to all event pages including livestreamed performances and short films.Explore Kathakali, the dance and mythic storytelling tradition from Kerala through performance, informative films, and dialogue in this unique immersive

Are you ready? Decoding Kathakali: The Artful Storytellers starts tonight! Head on over to viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakal...
08/27/2021

Are you ready? Decoding Kathakali: The Artful Storytellers starts tonight! Head on over to viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali to get your tickets 🎟

• Angry Red Colours of Dushasana •

Dushasana, played by Kalamandalam Hari R Nair, is flanked by Roudrabheema played by Kalamandalam Shanmukhan on his left in this photo. Meanwhile, a supine Lord Krishna is getting his chutti done at the other end of the room. Dushasana’s face is red, a colour symbolic of cruelty and depravity. Roudrabheema or Bheema in the throes of anger has some yellow but also some red to indicate that he has been transformed by rage in the episode. This is also suggested in his chutti by a layer tinted with sharp edges. Dushasana’s chutti has many finely cut paper bits. Here he is getting ready to place the chuttippoov, or white ball on the nose, all distinctive features of the look of a demonic character. Others in this list would be characters like Veerbhadra, Bali, Sugreeva (with slight variations in makeup to suggest their Simian identity) and Jarasantha whose makeup is identical to Dushasana. Interestingly, although Bheema is momentarily transformed by his extreme rage in this episode he does not wear the chuttippoov; instead Roudrabheema is indicated by a black moustache and streaks of red and yellow.

The New Indian Express in conversation with Devina Dutt (of First Edition Arts) on Decoding Kathakali: The Artful Storyt...
08/26/2021
Kathakali gets global spotlight

The New Indian Express in conversation with Devina Dutt (of First Edition Arts) on Decoding Kathakali: The Artful Storytellers!

The pandemic has shifted almost everything online, even art and craft.

• Lord Krishna Takes a Closer Look •Kalamandalam Adithyan again as another soft, good, noble, and satvik character of Lo...
08/25/2021

• Lord Krishna Takes a Closer Look •

Kalamandalam Adithyan again as another soft, good, noble, and satvik character of Lord Krishna in Dushasana Vadha (the killing of Dushasana). This is Adithyan as Krishna looking in the hand mirror that all actors use. The yellow base colour (vella manioyolo) and the forehead drawing of green and yellow is part of the look reserved for Gods and heroes. Once this is done, the chutti comprising thick wet pastes with thin cardboard paper lining the ridges of the face will be applied on the actor as he lies down and remains motionless till the makeup is done. But for now, says Adithyan, all he is thinking of is the character of Lord Krishna who consoles Bheema when he asks if he has sinned by killing his family members. It is a brief appearance, but Adithyan says he concentrates hard and shuts out the real world by thinking of the moment when he will step on stage.

Streaming this weekend: viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali

• Narasimha’s Ferocious and Distinctive Look •We started watching Narasimha played by Kottakal Devadas as he began his s...
08/23/2021

• Narasimha’s Ferocious and Distinctive Look •

We started watching Narasimha played by Kottakal Devadas as he began his six-hour makeup session. We sensed his growing remoteness and to be honest with every passing hour our discomfort seemed to grow. Here he is in full glory, having put on the crown. We were lucky we could get this photo done because he was clearly in character here. Since Narasimha only takes the stage at the end of the play, and he must take the stage within 15 minutes of being ready, the latter part of his transformation took place in an almost empty, darkened makeup room while the play was in progress. Part lion, part man, the intricate makeup and costume is layered with meaning. The garland is a symbol of the devotion that Lord Vishnu inspires and the yellow skirt is also reserved for Lord Vishnu and his avatars. Instead of the regular steel nails on the left hand that most actors wear. Narasimha’s makeup and headgear is truer to his part lion, part man identity.

Purchase your ticket today: viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali

08/16/2021

• Prahlada Charitham •

This popular mythological story and Kathakali play is based on the Bhagavata Purana and presents Lord Vishnu in his fourth avatar of the ferocious part man and part lion - Narasimha. The central figure in this play is young Prahlada, a child of ten or so, who despite being born to Hiranyakashipu, the arrogant and vicious King of the Daityas (demons), has a great devotion for Lord Vishnu who he insists is the Supreme and all-pervading Spirit of the Universe. This infuriates his father who tries to change his son’s views and even goes to the extent of ordering his killing. But, no harm is able to reach Prahlada. When he is brought back to his father’s court by his father’s servants who have failed to do away with him, Prahlada calmly reiterates his devotion to Lord Vishnu. His father is enraged and advances towards the child with his sword. He taunts the child by saying that if his beloved Lord Vishnu is really all-pervading then he must also reside in the pillar before him and proceeds to hit at it with his sword. A fierce and frightening part man, part lion figure emerges from the pillar and a terrible duel ensues in which Narasimha proceeds to maul and kill Hiranyakashipu mercilessly. The narrative arc, range of characters, and spectrum of dramatic emotions make this a quintessential Kathakali play.

Join us from August 27-28: viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali

A big thank you to the team over at First Edition Arts for their incredible efforts in this partnership, and for going o...
08/15/2021

A big thank you to the team over at First Edition Arts for their incredible efforts in this partnership, and for going out to Kerala to capture the high-quality films which will be presented as part of the program!

Informational short films are available August 20 onwards, with both performances streams then taking place August 27-28. Make sure you get your tickets before then to make the most of it!

We are delighted to be part of the exciting #DecodingKathakali Project, an amazing online festival that comprises a set of nine films on various aspects of the art form, as well as main performances on August 27 & 28. This will be followed by a live interaction with the artists Kalamandalam Shanmughan and 𝓐𝓭𝓲𝓽𝓱𝔂𝓪𝓷 𝓴𝓪𝓵𝓪𝓶𝓪𝓷𝓭𝓪𝓵𝓪𝓶, and the scholar and critic V Kaladharan. We would like to thank Society for Indian Music and Arts (SIMA) and Nritya for giving us this opportunity to collaborate with them. Thanks also to the support from University Park Allocation Committee, ICMSV - Indian Classical Music Society of Vancouver and Indian Fine Arts Academy, San Diego in making this all come together.
We absolutely loved working on the project with everybody involved. Our shoot in Kerala with these wonderful artists was a dream project. We also are greatly indebted to our line producer @Ramachandran Keli for his invaluable support and help.
Five behind the scenes films will be shared from August 20th onwards exclusively on Viewcy. They are: The Underlying Grammar of Cholliyattam; History and Tradition in Kathakali, Inside the Kathakali Makeup Room; Codified Gestures and Expressions; The Kathakali Soundscape.
The four main films, viz., Dance of Damayanthi; Dushasana Vadha; Usha and Chitralekha; and the festival finalé Prahlada Charitham will be streamed on 27 and 28 August.
Get your tickets here: https://www.viewcy.com/b/c3f78825-7bf6-4827-9867-3bb002389b75
You only need to purchase one ticket to the festival for access to everything. If you are having troubles accessing Viewcy, please refer to the online guide at https://viewcy.helpscoutdocs.com/ or email them at [email protected]
We look forward to seeing you there.

• Coconut Leaves and Stalks •A Kathakali makeup room is a place where time slows down. There’s none of the frenzy and ov...
08/13/2021

• Coconut Leaves and Stalks •

A Kathakali makeup room is a place where time slows down. There’s none of the frenzy and overt stress of a regular green room. The Kathakali makeup room is also a place of wonder. There’s enough time to wind a tender coconut leaf (narukk) used for keeping the various colours and pigments (manayola). The thin stalks of the leaf (eerkkila), are used for drawing lines on the face and are used in place of regular brushes.

Purchase your ticket today: viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali

08/11/2021

• The Kathakali Soundscape •

Kathakali music is resonant, high decibel, and highly rhythmic. It is a very distinctive and deliberately loud, high voltage sound. This film takes us into the heart of a Kathakali performance and we learn how stage musicians contribute to its making. For example, it is the singers who tell the story of the play verse by verse which the actors in turn interpret word for word through their mudras (hand gestures) and facial expressions. Typically, two musicians stand at the back of the performers. One plays a chenda, a cylindrical drum held vertically, played with curved sticks, and the other plays a maddalam held horizontally and played with the hands. They provide the bulk of the enveloping soundscape within which the action of the play unfolds. The idakka, is another hourglass-shaped drum played in a slightly more subdued and melodic intonation for female characters. The music accompanies the action, supplies the insistent rhythm, and emphasizes the mudras and dance steps. Two singers at the front of the stage have a gong and cymbals. Discover the many surprising nuances and facets of Kathakali music in this film.

Purchase your ticket today: viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali

• Imperious Hiranyakashipu •This is Hiranyakashipu the king of the daityas (demons). He is the archetypal pratinayaka or...
08/07/2021

• Imperious Hiranyakashipu •

This is Hiranyakashipu the king of the daityas (demons). He is the archetypal pratinayaka or anti-hero from Prahlada Charitham who is so drunk on his own ego and power that he cannot tolerate his young son’s pure devotion for Lord Vishnu. Played by Kalamandalam Pradeep Kumar this is a basic gesture of kartarimukha, the mudra indicating samayam (time). The metal nails are worn on the left hand of male characters to accentuate the stylized nature of the mudra, or hand gestures which are the basic language of the art form. The glittering, long nails are probably also another device or prop which helps break the sense of everyday reality and congruence, allowing our sense of the fabulous, make-believe and the dream-like other world to dominate instead.

Purchase your ticket today: viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali

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(425) 736-4652

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Renditions of Ragas Bhimpalasi and Bhupali by Kishan Patel and Akhil Jobanputra from Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh Videography: Lens Guys Studios
Renditions of Ragas Bihag and Puriya Dhanashri by Kishan Patel from Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh Videography: Lens Guys Studios
Tejas Tope’s tabla solos in Rupak, Tintala, and Ektala for Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh Videography: Lens Guys Studios
Performances of Ragas Marva and Nayaki Kanada by Akhil Jobanputra at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg’s Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh Videography: Lens Guys Studios
Pratyush Goberdhan's rendition of Raga Gavati at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg's Holiday Baithak is now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh Videography: Lens Guys Studios
On Sarasvati Puja day, we’ll be uploading performances from our holiday baithak which took place at the Harrisburg branch. Featuring a variety of Hindustani vocal and instrumental presentations, this three-day festival inaugurated concert programming at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg. Join us for daily uploads from February 5-10 on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh February 5: Arijit Mahalanabis (Hindustani vocal - Khayal) February 6: Pratyush Goberdhan (Hindustani instrumental - Sarangi) February 7: Akhil Jobanputra (Hindustani vocal - Khayal) February 8: Tejas Tope (Hindustani instrumental - Tabla) February 9: Kishan Patel (Hindustani vocal - Khayal) February 10: Kishan Patel & Akhil Jobanputra (Hindustani vocal - Khayal) Videography: Lens Guys Studios
Performances of Ragas Jhinjhoti and Gunkali by Arijit Mahalanabis at Society for Indian Music and Arts - Harrisburg's Holiday Baithak are now up on our YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh Videography: Lens Guys Studios
Join us tonight for Rituchakra Virtual Premiere at 7pm EST: https://youtu.be/oSXW6avBGak
Join us for the Rituchakra Virtual Premiere, taking place on October 21, 2021 at 7.00pm EST on our YouTube channel: youtube.com/c/SIMASandesh 'Rituchakra: A Musical Journey through the Seasons', presented live on October 13, 2019 at The State Theatre, follows the adventures of Lālī, a little girl in a small village in India, as she sets out to find and return the happiness of her village, which was stolen by the six seasons. This unique student production features a beautiful melange of original music, dance, story-telling, and art work, performed by student artists from SIMA and Nritya, and by well-known visiting artists from India.
Society for Indian Music and Arts and Nritya are excited to present the complete Ashtanayika series featuring Kathak exponent, Ranjana Phadke. Check out the videos under Anusandhan playlist on our Youtube channel. https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjzYlr5HZ3SlX2nLxK3YGXgZygAWCJfrI
The livestreaming of day 2 (Prahlada Charitham followed by Q and A session) is now available for viewing here: https://www.viewcy.com/e/decoding_kathakali__5
Are you ready? Decoding Kathakali: The Artful Storytellers starts tonight! Head on over to viewcy.com/o/decodingkathakali to get your tickets 🎟 • Angry Red Colours of Dushasana • Dushasana, played by Kalamandalam Hari R Nair, is flanked by Roudrabheema played by Kalamandalam Shanmukhan on his left in this photo. Meanwhile, a supine Lord Krishna is getting his chutti done at the other end of the room. Dushasana’s face is red, a colour symbolic of cruelty and depravity. Roudrabheema or Bheema in the throes of anger has some yellow but also some red to indicate that he has been transformed by rage in the episode. This is also suggested in his chutti by a layer tinted with sharp edges. Dushasana’s chutti has many finely cut paper bits. Here he is getting ready to place the chuttippoov, or white ball on the nose, all distinctive features of the look of a demonic character. Others in this list would be characters like Veerbhadra, Bali, Sugreeva (with slight variations in makeup to suggest their Simian identity) and Jarasantha whose makeup is identical to Dushasana. Interestingly, although Bheema is momentarily transformed by his extreme rage in this episode he does not wear the chuttippoov; instead Roudrabheema is indicated by a black moustache and streaks of red and yellow.