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Tzipora Art by Zipporah Michel, LLC

Tzipora Art by Zipporah Michel, LLC Culturally conscious illustrations of characters from both ancient and modern civilizations.

Zipporah Michel specializes in illustrated figures representing social issues and cultures of both ancient and modern civilizations.

*Located Gulfstream Park—Zero Empty Spaces.

*Artist’s Studio hours may vary during the week, but stagnant during the weekend.

*Walk-ins welcome for viewing and inquiry with the artist.

Operating as usual

“Japanese New Year 2022: Moon Goddess”Acrylic on Canvas30 inches x 48 inches2022Japanese New Year, or Shōgatsu and Ōshōg...
03/21/2022

“Japanese New Year 2022: Moon Goddess”
Acrylic on Canvas
30 inches x 48 inches
2022

Japanese New Year, or Shōgatsu and Ōshōgatsu in name variation, is a public holiday observed from January 1st to January 3rd. These festival days mark a new calendar year for the Japanese in which celebrations are done quietly in contrast to New York’s Ball Drop. The populace also have these few days off for nenmatsu nenshi (end of the year and beginning of the year) to spend time at home or travel to the country to visit close family members. Visiting ancient temples and shrines (called hatsumode), and decorating with lucky, various auspicious items ( shimekazari, kagami mochi, hagoita, and kadomatsu) are other activities the populace partakes in.

However, some western practices for the new year, such as countdown parties—such as the ones done in Tokyo—have been adopted, yet festivities remain quite tempered. In tribute to the tradition of bonenkai, or the “forget-the-year-party”New Year’s Eve party that coworkers in offices celebrate to forget the trouble and stress brought upon them the previous year, the moon god—Tsukuyomi—is painted in a combination of the Heian-era style combined with modern gothic lo**ta.

“Japanese New Year 2022: Sun Goddess”Acrylic on Canvas30 inches x 48 inches2022Japanese New Year, or Shōgatsu and Ōshōga...
03/21/2022

“Japanese New Year 2022: Sun Goddess”
Acrylic on Canvas
30 inches x 48 inches
2022

Japanese New Year, or Shōgatsu and Ōshōgatsu in name variation, is a public holiday observed from January 1st to January 3rd. These festival days mark a new calendar year for the Japanese in which celebrations are done quietly in contrast to New York’s Ball Drop. The populace also have these few days off for nenmatsu nenshi (end of the year and beginning of the year) to spend time at home or travel to the country to visit close family members. Visiting ancient temples and shrines (called hatsumode), and decorating with lucky, various auspicious items ( shimekazari, kagami mochi, hagoita, and kadomatsu) are other activities the populace partakes in. However, some western practices for the new year, such as countdown parties—such as the ones done in Tokyo—have been adopted, yet festivities remain quite tempered. In tribute to the tradition of hatsumode, or the activity of watching the sun rise from the ancient temples and shrines, the sun goddess—Amaterasu—is painted in a combination of the Heian-era style combined with modern gothic lo**ta.

Superfine! Art Fair 2022 Vernissage March 10, 2022
03/21/2022

Superfine! Art Fair 2022 Vernissage March 10, 2022

Su•i ge•ne•ris Art Exhibition Opening Night
01/22/2022

Su•i ge•ne•ris Art Exhibition Opening Night

01/21/2022

New Partnership with Black Owned Midwest

Photos from Tzipora Art by Zipporah Michel, LLC's post
10/21/2021

Photos from Tzipora Art by Zipporah Michel, LLC's post

“Back to School, Back Together” Group Art Project at Miami International Mall with Andrea Ciatti, Ivana Rashlich, Zahra ...
08/28/2021

“Back to School, Back Together” Group Art Project at Miami International Mall with Andrea Ciatti, Ivana Rashlich, Zahra Farooq, and Lucia Morales.

NMB Senior Luncheon 2021
08/28/2021

NMB Senior Luncheon 2021

“Reflections of Oneself” Exhibit at Boca Raton Innovation Campus by Zero Empty Spaces.
08/28/2021

“Reflections of Oneself” Exhibit at Boca Raton Innovation Campus by Zero Empty Spaces.

“Da and His Dreams: The Story of Awareness and Haitian Lwa Coloring Book” Written by Charlene Desir & Abney L. Henderson...
07/03/2021

“Da and His Dreams: The Story of Awareness and Haitian Lwa Coloring Book”
Written by Charlene Desir & Abney L. Henderson
Illustrated by Zipporah Michel

Support the education of Haitian youth:
https://www.tenglobal.com/

“La Sirene”Mixed Media14 inches x 22 inches2021(Art Commission for T.E.N. Global, Inc.)Known as the Queen of the Seas or...
07/03/2021

“La Sirene”
Mixed Media
14 inches x 22 inches
2021
(Art Commission for T.E.N. Global, Inc.)

Known as the Queen of the Seas or a siren, La Sirene is a mermaid with long flowing hair, a decorative fish tail, and considered a rare beauty that is also the patron of music—playing seductive music on her trumpet. Full of many secrets and ancient knowledge, La Sirene is accompanied by Agwe—the spirit of the sea.

“Da and His Dreams: The Story of Awareness and Haitian Lwa Coloring Book”
Written by Charlene Desir & Abney L. Henderson
Illustrated by Zipporah Michel

Support the education of Haitian youth:
https://www.tenglobal.com/

🇭🇹🌺☀️🎺🧜🏾‍♀️🏝

“Princess Akanase”Acrylic on Canvas8 inches x 8 inches2021—Donated to Broward Art GuildPurchase from Broward Art Guild f...
07/03/2021

“Princess Akanase”
Acrylic on Canvas
8 inches x 8 inches
2021

—Donated to Broward Art Guild
Purchase from Broward Art Guild for $50.00 to support their workshops, future art exhibitions, community programs, and more!

“Ōnna-bugeisha, Chitose and Yoshimasa”Acrylic on Canvas30 inches x 40 inches2021—$4,500.00Ōnna-bugeisha or ōnna-musha re...
06/14/2021

“Ōnna-bugeisha, Chitose and Yoshimasa”
Acrylic on Canvas
30 inches x 40 inches
2021
—$4,500.00

Ōnna-bugeisha or ōnna-musha refers to female warriors in the eras before modern Japan (I.e. before the 19th century). Battling alongside male samurai, these noble women were of the bushi class of samurai were trained and equipped with weapons such as the naginata, katana, yari, and bow and arrow. Weapons of the onna-musha were primarily used to defend estates from invaders from a distance. The katana is a single-edged sword and the yari is a straight-headed spear while the naginata—a pole arm with a long blade atop that is similar to the European glaive—is the most iconic weapon of choice amongst the onna-musha and also used by standard foot soldiers of feudal Japan.

Many flourished during the Sengoku period (1467 to 1615), but as samurai became more concerned with politics and bureaucracy by the early 15th century. Neo-Confucianism had taken root in the Edo period that saw to it that women were to tend to their homes and families. Remaining warrior women during this age were often harassed for their status. Despite the change in policies and government, the onna-bugeisha continued to fight alongside the samurai against invaders until the Satsuma Rebellion—which saw to the end of both samurai and onna-musha history.

Today, there are statues and modern inspirations in Japan honoring warrior women that fought to protect their country including Nakano Takeko, Myōrin, Empress Jingu, Hojo Masako, Niijima Yae, and Yodo-dono.

🎌🎎🏯⚔️🌜🌞🏮🎏🗻🌏🎍

“Patron of Revolution and Independence, Ezili Dantor”Acrylic on Canvas30 inches x 40 inches2021In voudou culture and fol...
05/20/2021

“Patron of Revolution and Independence, Ezili Dantor”
Acrylic on Canvas
30 inches x 40 inches
2021

In voudou culture and folk Catholicism, Ezili Dantor is the known to be a guardian of women, especially mothers, and of fluid sexuality. She is the embodiment of raw femininity and fierce passion of a warrior. In a partnership with the warrior spirit Ogun, Dantor would rather act than sit and lament. It is said that she served alongside her lover and initiated the Haitian Revolution. However, Ogun severed her tongue afterwards to protect their secrets. Only her children act as interpreters.

She is often depicted as a dark-skinned Madonna with scars carrying a babe in one arm and a dagger in the other. Her sacred day is both Tuesday and Saturday.

“Patron of Love and Beauty, Ezili Freda”Acrylic on Canvas30 inches x 40 inches2021In voudou culture and folk Catholicism...
05/10/2021

“Patron of Love and Beauty, Ezili Freda”
Acrylic on Canvas
30 inches x 40 inches
2021

In voudou culture and folk Catholicism, Ezili Freda is the known to be a spirit of love, beauty, jewelry, dancing, and flowers. She is the embodiment of femininity and compassion, acting more of a mistress than a wife. Having three wedding rings for each of her husbands (Ogun Feray, Danbala, and Met Agwe), she rules over the heart and blesses others with romantic love. At times, she becomes jealous of other women and even fought her own sister, Ezili Dantor, leaving her sister’s face with a pair of scars over a hand in marriage with Ogun. However, she also dreams of a peaceful world, but as harsh reality sets in, she weeps. Her sacred day is Thursday.

Fountainhead’s Artists Open Art studio event.
05/10/2021

Fountainhead’s Artists Open Art studio event.

Progress on “Ezili Freda”, Acrylic on Canvas.
05/06/2021

Progress on “Ezili Freda”, Acrylic on Canvas.

“Sizani: The Reservoir”🌞🌛Acrylic on ABS Plastic44” x 23” x 43”2021My world is a multicultural adventure. There are a ple...
05/04/2021

“Sizani: The Reservoir”🌞🌛
Acrylic on ABS Plastic
44” x 23” x 43”
2021

My world is a multicultural adventure. There are a plethora of subjects to cover, people to meet, and places to see—all of which should be taken in with an open mind. For this piece, I used acrylic paint and added a wreath frame for the neck rings—which symbolize wealth in some cultures. I purposefully kept overlaying color after color on the body to symbolize how not one person is this monotonous color as well as positioning it holding out a decorated ring in invitation to an experience to the viewer(s).

Tune on Mother's Day!
04/30/2021

Tune on Mother's Day!



Also visit Grace Haitian UMC for live stream! See you there!😁

Zero Empty Spaces | Doral Open Studios Event
04/18/2021

Zero Empty Spaces | Doral Open Studios Event

04/16/2021

So for artists who want to promote their studio:

On Saturday, May 8, 11am-6pm join us for , organized by , Artists Open invites the public into over 250 artist studios across Miami-Dade County - get an intimate, behind-the-scenes look at artists and their practice and explore their studios. Masks and registration are required - visit the link in bio to sign up!

So for artists who want to promote their studio:On Saturday, May 8, 11am-6pm join us for , organized by , Artists Open i...
04/16/2021

So for artists who want to promote their studio:

On Saturday, May 8, 11am-6pm join us for , organized by , Artists Open invites the public into over 250 artist studios across Miami-Dade County - get an intimate, behind-the-scenes look at artists and their practice and explore their studios. Masks and registration are required - visit the link in bio to sign up!

Address

1455 NW 107th Ave, #13
Doral, FL
33172

Opening Hours

Monday 4:30pm - 8pm
Thursday 4:30pm - 8pm
Friday 4:30pm - 9pm
Saturday 4:30pm - 9pm
Sunday 3:30pm - 7pm

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Discover artist Zipporah Michel! Her work has been selected to be a part of an art collection at Sailboat Bend II for the Aya Arts Project. The Aya Arts Project is a permanent art installation curated by artist Niki Lopez. It is a Sailboat Bend II Community Arts Engagement & Acquisition Project brought to you by Niki Lopez of Niki Lopez Creative & What’s Your Elephant for the HACFL- Housing Authority of the City of Fort Lauderdale and Atlantic Pacific Companies. Sailboat Bend II is a new affordable housing building for seniors.

For more information about the art project and the next virtual chat, go to https://whatsyourelephant.org/aya-arts-project/

Born in 1992, Zipporah Michel is a Haitian-American South Florida artist trained in graphic design, illustration, and fine arts. Growing up traveling to different countries, Michel became enraptured by the vibrant cultures that these civilizations had to offer authentically on-screen in storytelling and through her artwork in colorful illustrations in mixed media and paint.


Zipporah Michel
Atlantic Pacific Companies


What's Your Elephant
Join us Friday, September 18; 6-8 PM for the What’s Your Elephant: Safer at Home Artists Talk.

- Cindy K Shaw
- Allison Bolah
- Zipporah Michel
- Jose Silva
- Nikki Detourbutterfly Saraiva

- Moderated by Niki Lopez and Khaulah Naima Nuruddin

- Keachia M. Bowers, MSW of Movements for Change. A holistic practitioner of Transformative Healing

REGISTER FOR THE ZOOM: http://bit.ly/WYE_artiststalk1ZOOM

Welcome to the annual ‘What’s Your Elephant’ art exhibition. Each year, artworks selected reflect an ‘elephant in the room’ topic. This year the goal is to address topics that relate to ‘at-risk’ demographics, people and issues that have been heightened due to the global pandemic.pandemic and shelter in place which leaves at-risk people vulnerable This pandemic has pushed everyone to ‘shelter in place’ with many safe spaces and resources being closed or having limited public access. Though there are various opinions about the pandemic, however, the impact is felt far and wide. Such as domestic violence incidents have gone up and home is not always a safe space for many people.

The What’s Your Elephant: Safer at Home 2020 annual exhibition & virtual chat aims to bring awareness to some of those topics.

This will also be streamed LIVE: https://www.facebook.com/whatsyourelephant

This is 1 of 2 Artists Talks.
Second talk with be Friday, September 25; 6-8 PM

The What’s Your Elephant is a movement that uses the arts to create a safe space to address the unspoken. For more information about the exhibition: https://whatsyourelephant.org/event/wye2020opening/

Zipporah Michel is a culturally conscious illustrator with a deep interest in ancient civilizations and enriched tribal histories. Here is one of many incredible works. .art.gallery
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“The Expressionist Painter, Alma Woodsey Thomas”
Mixed Media on Paper
11 inches x 14 inches
Zipporah Michel
2020

Born on September 22, 1891, Alma Woodsey Thomas was oldest among four children as her father was worked as a businessman and her mother worked as a dress designer. Thomas was described to be exceptionally creative as a child as she grew up in Columbus, Georgia—making countless works consisting of puppets, painted china, and sculptures that remained in the home she was born and raised. She excelled in math and science in school, learned to play the violin, but gained a deep interest in architecture. Thomas and her family then moved to Washington DC once racial violence began to escalate in Georgia.

The city offered more opportunities for African-Americans and Thomas sought to pursue her artistic agenda, but studying architecture as a woman grounded her chances at being a successful one. She studied early childhood education at Miner Normal School after graduating from Armstrong Technical High School for visual arts. The next few years were spent as a substitute teacher before becoming a fully licensed teacher working in Maryland and taught kindergarten in Delaware.

By the early 1920s, Thomas attended Howard College under the artistic tutelage of James V. Herring. Loïs Mailiu Jones, another professor and renowned artist, encouraged her to experiment with abstraction—a style that was new to the American public—and joined “The Little Paris Group” led by Jones. At Shaw Junior High School, Thomas continued teaching. She also founded a visual arts department with community projects for art appreciation. Resolute in teaching until her retirement in 1960, she became one of the first African American women to earn an art degree (also earning her Masters in Art Education at Columbia University).
Live with Niki Lopez, Doris Araujo, Marilyn Walter, Zipporah Michel, Liesa Cole, Carol-Anne McFarlane and Sophie Bonet!
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