ICE Collaborative Arts

ICE Collaborative Arts Performing Arts Company for Youth and Educational Theatre in Ashburn, Virginia. Performing Arts Company for Youth in Damascus, Maryland and Ashburn, Virginia

Operating as usual

Without showing too much... check out some shots from our first She Kills Monsters shoot today. These warriors are killi...
04/24/2021

Without showing too much... check out some shots from our first She Kills Monsters shoot today. These warriors are killing it.

Without showing too much... check out some shots from our first She Kills Monsters shoot today. These warriors are killing it.

Happy Birthday to our wonderful Ms.Catina!! Thank you for everything you do🥰 have a great birthday!!
04/02/2021

Happy Birthday to our wonderful Ms.Catina!! Thank you for everything you do🥰 have a great birthday!!

Happy Birthday to our wonderful Ms.Catina!! Thank you for everything you do🥰 have a great birthday!!

💜Tuesday Tips💜Here are a few things to make sure you don’t do at an audition.    1.    Forgetting - Forgetting the mater...
03/23/2021

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Here are a few things to make sure you don’t do at an audition.

    1.    Forgetting - Forgetting the material on the spot. Auditions can shake your nerves, which will sometimes make your mind so worried about your skills that you forget the material you were supposed to memorize. Remember to practice beforehand and once you’re auditioning, give it your 100%. If you forget your spot, take a deep breath, and pick up from where you can remember.
    2.    Rushing - Rushing can be a big problem in your acting, singing, and even dance auditions. Again, your nerves will make you want to get out of the audition as soon as possible, so you might unintentionally rush. Just remember to take your time and own the space.
    3.    Staring Down - Sometimes you will be allowed sides(scripts) or sheet music for your audition. If permitted, feel free to use them, but don’t forget to look up whenever you can during the audition. The judges want to see your face as much as possible, and looking down at your papers will prevent that.  
    4.    Losing Your Place - Like forgetting your monologue, sometimes nerves can make you slip up and forget where you are in your sides/sheet music. Try your best to keep calm and listen to the other performers/musicians in the audition to see if you can find your place again without stopping the scene and asking to start over.

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Here are a few things to make sure you don’t do at an audition.

    1.    Forgetting - Forgetting the material on the spot. Auditions can shake your nerves, which will sometimes make your mind so worried about your skills that you forget the material you were supposed to memorize. Remember to practice beforehand and once you’re auditioning, give it your 100%. If you forget your spot, take a deep breath, and pick up from where you can remember.
    2.    Rushing - Rushing can be a big problem in your acting, singing, and even dance auditions. Again, your nerves will make you want to get out of the audition as soon as possible, so you might unintentionally rush. Just remember to take your time and own the space.
    3.    Staring Down - Sometimes you will be allowed sides(scripts) or sheet music for your audition. If permitted, feel free to use them, but don’t forget to look up whenever you can during the audition. The judges want to see your face as much as possible, and looking down at your papers will prevent that.  
    4.    Losing Your Place - Like forgetting your monologue, sometimes nerves can make you slip up and forget where you are in your sides/sheet music. Try your best to keep calm and listen to the other performers/musicians in the audition to see if you can find your place again without stopping the scene and asking to start over.

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣In-person theatre may be hitting some very difficult obstacles in this period of COVID, but th...
03/18/2021

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣

In-person theatre may be hitting some very difficult obstacles in this period of COVID, but theatre has overcome hard times before. Between 1593 and 1594, every single theater was shut down throughout the city of London, England. A deadly plague had been troubling the area for quite some time now, but it got much worse around this time period, killing thousands of people. Throughout 1593 and 1594, theatre was mistakenly thought to be a cause of the plague and a generally bad influence, so they were shut down in London. They didn’t open back up until around 1604. But during this time of plague, the arts didn’t completely die out. In fact, Shakespeare wrote King Lear during that pandemic!

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣

In-person theatre may be hitting some very difficult obstacles in this period of COVID, but theatre has overcome hard times before. Between 1593 and 1594, every single theater was shut down throughout the city of London, England. A deadly plague had been troubling the area for quite some time now, but it got much worse around this time period, killing thousands of people. Throughout 1593 and 1594, theatre was mistakenly thought to be a cause of the plague and a generally bad influence, so they were shut down in London. They didn’t open back up until around 1604. But during this time of plague, the arts didn’t completely die out. In fact, Shakespeare wrote King Lear during that pandemic!

💜Tuesday Tips💜Here are some mistakes often made on the night of a performance, that every performer can look out for.   ...
03/16/2021

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Here are some mistakes often made on the night of a performance, that every performer can look out for.

    1.    Cheating - Cheating out is a tactic where a performer will angle their body to show the audience their performance more than how they would actually stand if they were having a real conversation with the person on stage with them. Be sure to remember this skill and to keep these angles up during your performance, as it helps the audience get their best view of you.
    2.    Props - Be sure to check for your props before the start of the show. If anything needs to be pre-set somewhere onstage, double check that it’s there. If you’re checking/setting your prop back down on the prop table after your performance, or at any point, remember not to touch any props except your own.
    3.    Blocking the Crew - While this may not be a virtual issue, it’s very important for in-person performances. The running crew may have many different transitions that require a lot of space. Be sure to stay away from the wings when you don’t have to be there, and if you see/hear them coming, get out of their way to avoid any accidents from happening.   
    4.    Mics - If you wear a microphone for your performance, be careful when putting it on and using the mic tape, to ensure that you get it in the right spot and you don’t have to move the mic or the tape mid-show. If your show does pre-show mic checks, be on time for them, and be ready to work with them. The tech crew has a lot of things to handle pre-show, so be patient and respectful if they need to adjust your mic-settings or fix an issue.
    5.    Costumes - Make sure your costumes, like your props, are pre-set, if you have any quick changes in which they need to be. In addition, wash the costume pieces that you are able to between shows (for example, tights and socks). If you notice any tears or markups on your costume, contact the costume crew as soon as possible to figure out what to do about either adapting or replacing the costume piece.

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Here are some mistakes often made on the night of a performance, that every performer can look out for.

    1.    Cheating - Cheating out is a tactic where a performer will angle their body to show the audience their performance more than how they would actually stand if they were having a real conversation with the person on stage with them. Be sure to remember this skill and to keep these angles up during your performance, as it helps the audience get their best view of you.
    2.    Props - Be sure to check for your props before the start of the show. If anything needs to be pre-set somewhere onstage, double check that it’s there. If you’re checking/setting your prop back down on the prop table after your performance, or at any point, remember not to touch any props except your own.
    3.    Blocking the Crew - While this may not be a virtual issue, it’s very important for in-person performances. The running crew may have many different transitions that require a lot of space. Be sure to stay away from the wings when you don’t have to be there, and if you see/hear them coming, get out of their way to avoid any accidents from happening.   
    4.    Mics - If you wear a microphone for your performance, be careful when putting it on and using the mic tape, to ensure that you get it in the right spot and you don’t have to move the mic or the tape mid-show. If your show does pre-show mic checks, be on time for them, and be ready to work with them. The tech crew has a lot of things to handle pre-show, so be patient and respectful if they need to adjust your mic-settings or fix an issue.
    5.    Costumes - Make sure your costumes, like your props, are pre-set, if you have any quick changes in which they need to be. In addition, wash the costume pieces that you are able to between shows (for example, tights and socks). If you notice any tears or markups on your costume, contact the costume crew as soon as possible to figure out what to do about either adapting or replacing the costume piece.

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣For many of the early years of theatre history, women were not allowed to act in productions a...
03/11/2021

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣

For many of the early years of theatre history, women were not allowed to act in productions around the world. Most classic Greek Plays would have female characters that would be portrayed by male actors. Some considered it improper for a woman to be on a stage, and in some places, women weren’t even permitted into the audience, as they were considered distractions. A notable example of this would be the instances where male actors performed as Clytemnestra in the famous Greek tragedy, Agamemnon. This would be especially easy with the use of masks in most plays of that time period. This all changed after the restoration of King Charles II to his throne. Under his rule, the first actresses in England took the stage without breaking any laws.

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣

For many of the early years of theatre history, women were not allowed to act in productions around the world. Most classic Greek Plays would have female characters that would be portrayed by male actors. Some considered it improper for a woman to be on a stage, and in some places, women weren’t even permitted into the audience, as they were considered distractions. A notable example of this would be the instances where male actors performed as Clytemnestra in the famous Greek tragedy, Agamemnon. This would be especially easy with the use of masks in most plays of that time period. This all changed after the restoration of King Charles II to his throne. Under his rule, the first actresses in England took the stage without breaking any laws.

🥳We are officially booked full for private lessons for the months of March, May, and April!! 🥳We are so excited to have ...
03/11/2021

🥳We are officially booked full for private lessons for the months of March, May, and April!! 🥳

We are so excited to have so many long-term private lesson students. We have seen so much improvement in confidence and techniques with our students in the past few months.

We will be offering one off sessions only on Saturdays for the next few months.

If you would like to join our waitlist please send us an email!

Thank you all for your dedication and support. ❤️

🥳We are officially booked full for private lessons for the months of March, May, and April!! 🥳

We are so excited to have so many long-term private lesson students. We have seen so much improvement in confidence and techniques with our students in the past few months.

We will be offering one off sessions only on Saturdays for the next few months.

If you would like to join our waitlist please send us an email!

Thank you all for your dedication and support. ❤️

💜Tuesday Tips💜Partner work is an important part of performing arts. Whether this refers to a scene partner, dance partne...
03/09/2021

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Partner work is an important part of performing arts. Whether this refers to a scene partner, dance partner, or someone you duet with, here are a few tips on how to ensure that your teamwork goes as smoothly as possible.

    1.    Flexibility - Being flexible is necessary of any performing artist, especially in acting. Be ready for changes, and be willing to try different things with the project that you’re crafting together. Understand that sometimes your ideas will work out, and sometimes your partner will disagree with them. Be willing to find compromises and to hear out other opinions.
    2.    Giving/Receiving Criticism - Unless you’re the director/instructor, there is no guarantee that the person you’re working with will want to hear your criticism. Always ask if it’s alright to give notes before you give them, and only give criticism if it’s constructive. When you receive criticism from your partner, try not to get defensive. Every performance can be interpreted in dozens of different ways, so if your partner makes a suggestion that you don’t agree with, that doesn’t necessarily mean either of you are right or wrong.
    3.    Communication - Anyone who’s done a group project with their school knows how frustrating it can be when people in your group refuse to communicate their questions and issues during the process, and it’s just as frustrating with theatre arts. If you can’t make it to a rehearsal, try to let your partner know as early on as possible, and be open to rescheduling. If you don’t like or understand some part of your scene, talk to your partner and see if you can work together for a better scene.   
    4.    Practice - Practice always makes perfect. Be sure to practice your performance with your partner in advance. Hold as many rehearsals as it takes until you both feel comfortable with what you’ve created. During these practices, be present and participate with your partner, to ensure that no time is wasted, and that you are spending your rehearsal time bettering your work. This will show respect for your partner and your art!

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Partner work is an important part of performing arts. Whether this refers to a scene partner, dance partner, or someone you duet with, here are a few tips on how to ensure that your teamwork goes as smoothly as possible.

    1.    Flexibility - Being flexible is necessary of any performing artist, especially in acting. Be ready for changes, and be willing to try different things with the project that you’re crafting together. Understand that sometimes your ideas will work out, and sometimes your partner will disagree with them. Be willing to find compromises and to hear out other opinions.
    2.    Giving/Receiving Criticism - Unless you’re the director/instructor, there is no guarantee that the person you’re working with will want to hear your criticism. Always ask if it’s alright to give notes before you give them, and only give criticism if it’s constructive. When you receive criticism from your partner, try not to get defensive. Every performance can be interpreted in dozens of different ways, so if your partner makes a suggestion that you don’t agree with, that doesn’t necessarily mean either of you are right or wrong.
    3.    Communication - Anyone who’s done a group project with their school knows how frustrating it can be when people in your group refuse to communicate their questions and issues during the process, and it’s just as frustrating with theatre arts. If you can’t make it to a rehearsal, try to let your partner know as early on as possible, and be open to rescheduling. If you don’t like or understand some part of your scene, talk to your partner and see if you can work together for a better scene.   
    4.    Practice - Practice always makes perfect. Be sure to practice your performance with your partner in advance. Hold as many rehearsals as it takes until you both feel comfortable with what you’ve created. During these practices, be present and participate with your partner, to ensure that no time is wasted, and that you are spending your rehearsal time bettering your work. This will show respect for your partner and your art!

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣In many modern day musical performances, the orchestra pit is known as a pit or area in which ...
03/04/2021

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣

In many modern day musical performances, the orchestra pit is known as a pit or area in which the orchestra/band/musicians perform during a show. However, in Ancient Greek theatre, the orchestra area took on a very different meaning. In Ancient Greek theaters, the “orchestra” pit was actually the center of their circular theatre area, as we have discussed in previous posts. This would be where the show’s high energy dances would take place in, with the stage raised in the center. This pit would also have an altar for sacrifices to the Greek God Dionysus.

📣THEATRE HISTORY THURSDAY📣

In many modern day musical performances, the orchestra pit is known as a pit or area in which the orchestra/band/musicians perform during a show. However, in Ancient Greek theatre, the orchestra area took on a very different meaning. In Ancient Greek theaters, the “orchestra” pit was actually the center of their circular theatre area, as we have discussed in previous posts. This would be where the show’s high energy dances would take place in, with the stage raised in the center. This pit would also have an altar for sacrifices to the Greek God Dionysus.

💜Tuesday Tips💜Even before the COVID-period, self-taping has been a very important part of the college process. Most pre-...
03/02/2021

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Even before the COVID-period, self-taping has been a very important part of the college process. Most pre-screenings will be self-tapes, and this year, most of your auditions will be taped or over zoom. Here’s some advice on how to make your videos great.

    1.    Setting - There are several things to look for when you’re picking where you want to film your audition. Make sure your background isn’t too distracting, but also make sure the color(s) behind you don’t wash out your features or blend in with your clothes. Make sure your lighting illuminates your features, but isn’t so extreme that the light washes out your features. Consider buying a ring light off of Amazon. Lastly, try to find a quiet area, as you won’t want any background noises distracting from your performance.
    2.    Energy - Having energy right from the start is one of the most important yet often overlooked part of a filmed audition. The people watching your audition are likely watching hundreds of others, so be sure to capture their attention right from the first second. Relax, be yourself, and don’t be lazy.
    3.    Position - Check to see that your camera is in the right position to film as the audition requirements instruct you to. Most schools will want you to shoot your videos horizontally, but you should always check to see what they ask from you, and how much of your body they want in frame.   
    4.    Take multiple shots - Even after you’ve finally nailed your self-tape, make sure to film another two or three versions. This will ensure that you likely will have at least one working version of your audition, without any audio hiccups, interrupting noises, or framing mistakes that you didn’t notice while you were acting.

💜Tuesday Tips💜

Even before the COVID-period, self-taping has been a very important part of the college process. Most pre-screenings will be self-tapes, and this year, most of your auditions will be taped or over zoom. Here’s some advice on how to make your videos great.

    1.    Setting - There are several things to look for when you’re picking where you want to film your audition. Make sure your background isn’t too distracting, but also make sure the color(s) behind you don’t wash out your features or blend in with your clothes. Make sure your lighting illuminates your features, but isn’t so extreme that the light washes out your features. Consider buying a ring light off of Amazon. Lastly, try to find a quiet area, as you won’t want any background noises distracting from your performance.
    2.    Energy - Having energy right from the start is one of the most important yet often overlooked part of a filmed audition. The people watching your audition are likely watching hundreds of others, so be sure to capture their attention right from the first second. Relax, be yourself, and don’t be lazy.
    3.    Position - Check to see that your camera is in the right position to film as the audition requirements instruct you to. Most schools will want you to shoot your videos horizontally, but you should always check to see what they ask from you, and how much of your body they want in frame.   
    4.    Take multiple shots - Even after you’ve finally nailed your self-tape, make sure to film another two or three versions. This will ensure that you likely will have at least one working version of your audition, without any audio hiccups, interrupting noises, or framing mistakes that you didn’t notice while you were acting.

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Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 21:00
Tuesday 11:00 - 21:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 21:00
Thursday 11:00 - 21:00
Friday 11:00 - 21:00
Saturday 10:00 - 21:00
Sunday 12:00 - 21:00

Telephone

(703) 963-9965

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Performing Arts Company for Youth Performances, Lessons, Classes, and Workshops in Ashburn, Virginia

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🤣 Forget Franklin Park. I vote the next ICE production is performed in the crosswalk at E. Market and Catoctin Circle in Leesburg.