Oracle Berlin

Oracle Berlin Kontaktinformationen, Karte und Wegbeschreibungen, Kontaktformulare, Öffnungszeiten, Dienstleistungen, Bewertungen, Fotos, Videos und Ankündigungen von Oracle Berlin, Kunstgalerie, Joachimsthaler Str 14, Berlin.
(1)

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
16/06/2018

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
23/03/2018

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

Our current exhibition Sancho Panza on CAD. Come by and visit us! X
02/03/2018
“Sancho Panza” at Oracle (Contemporary Art Daily)

Our current exhibition Sancho Panza on CAD. Come by and visit us! X

Contemporary Art Daily. A Daily Journal of International Exhibitions. | Artists: Abel Auer, Monika Baer, Juliette Blightman, Michaela Eichwald, Rochelle Goldberg, Paul Gondry, Alexander Hardashnakov, Yannic Joray, Armin Krämer, Veit

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
09/01/2018

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

14/10/2017

Oracle is open today! Come by! x

07/10/2017

Oracle is open today! Come and visit Samuel Jeffery's exhibition. X

16/09/2017

Oracle is open today, Saturday 16 September from 12pm to 6pm! X

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
23/08/2017

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

http://www.aqnb.com/2017/08/02/auguring-the-near-future-at-two-and-a-half-minutes-to-midnight-in-puppies-puppies-mundane...
02/08/2017
Auguring the near future at two-and-a-half minutes to midnight in Puppies Puppies’ mundane mass destruction at Berlin’s Oracle

http://www.aqnb.com/2017/08/02/auguring-the-near-future-at-two-and-a-half-minutes-to-midnight-in-puppies-puppies-mundane-mass-destruction-at-berlins-oracle/

Puppies Puppies prefers the gender-neutral pronoun ‘their’ or ‘they’ when referring to their work, which is intentionally confusing. The LA-based artist’s canine moniker — a droll reference to kits…

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
26/05/2017

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

Studio for Propositional CinemaRedundant as eyelids in absence of light. *By Order of [...], and With Immediate Effect;o...
19/03/2017

Studio for Propositional Cinema
Redundant as eyelids in absence of light. *By Order of [...], and With Immediate Effect;
offset print with reflective copper ink on paper
43 x 43 cm
Courtesy of Studio for Propositional Cinema and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin

Installation view, Jenny Holzer, Inflammatory Essays, Oracle, Berlin
16/03/2017

Installation view, Jenny Holzer, Inflammatory Essays, Oracle, Berlin

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
17/02/2017

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
26/09/2016

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

Dan Mitchell - New Dead City
11/09/2016

Dan Mitchell - New Dead City

20/08/2016

Oracle is open today, Saturday 20 August from 2pm to 5pm

13/08/2016

Oracle is open today, Saturday 13 August from 2pm to 5pm

06/08/2016

Oracle is open today, Saturday 6 August from 2pm to 5pm

30/07/2016

Oracle is open today, Saturday 30 July from 2pm to 5pm

22/07/2016

Oracle will be open tomorrow, Saturday 23 July from 2pm to 5pm

29/06/2016

Just finished the catalogue for the show, looks great...

Timeline Photos
23/06/2016

Timeline Photos

Oracle Berlin's cover photo
22/06/2016

Oracle Berlin's cover photo

Ariane Müller  'afterwards by patience, perseverance, practice, I cameto be one of the best at jumping off moving vehicl...
01/05/2016
Ariane Müller At Oracle

Ariane Müller 'afterwards by patience, perseverance, practice, I cameto be one of the best at jumping off moving vehicles. Time, time, time has taken away the value of that lesson' at Contemporary Art Daily

28/04/2016

ORACLE IS OPEN THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY FROM 11.30AM - 6PM.

Last chance to see Ariane Müller´s exhibition

'afterwards by patience, perseverance, practice, I came
to be one of the best at jumping off moving vehicles.
Time, time, time has taken away the value of that lesson'

Ariane Müller 'afterwards by patience, perseverance, practice, I cameto be one of the best at jumping off moving vehicle...
02/04/2016

Ariane Müller

'afterwards by patience, perseverance, practice, I came
to be one of the best at jumping off moving vehicles.
Time, time, time has taken away the value of that lesson'

Ariane Müller

'afterwards by patience, perseverance, practice, I came
to be one of the best at jumping off moving vehicles.
Time, time, time has taken away the value of that lesson'

Daniel Keller on Peter Fend: to be built, in the new issue of Texte zur Kunst.
05/03/2016
www.textezurkunst.de

Daniel Keller on Peter Fend: to be built, in the new issue of Texte zur Kunst.

Raphael Linsi - Der Geruch des noch warmen Motors eines am Fusse
19/02/2016

Raphael Linsi - Der Geruch des noch warmen Motors eines am Fusse

My EyesIt was about four years ago that I underwent laser eye surgery. Firstly, I had my eyes checked at the ophthalmolo...
10/12/2015

My Eyes
It was about four years ago that I underwent laser eye surgery. Firstly, I had my eyes checked at the ophthalmologist’s where I was told that I was suited to have the operation – it’s a common and simple procedure. Two weeks later I sat nervously in the small and tasteful waiting room of a Laser Institute nearby Lake Geneva. The Valium I was given took my anxiety away just in time before I was taken into the darkened operating theatre where a doctor and his assistant awaited me.
I laid down. The doctor began to put clamps on my eyes so that I was no longer able to close them. The clamps were quite uncomfortable although the pain faded soon after my eyes had been moistened with anesthetizing drops. In the first step the cornea is cut so that it can be flapped open. The doctor told me not to move my head and to look directly into the light. Its odd knowing that a machine is touching your eye. I couldn’t actually feel it but I remember experiencing beautiful visuals – panopticon-like circles changed shape and colour as the scalpel slid through my cornea. Afterwards, the bed rotated about the axis and over to the laser machine where the doctor covered my face with plastic, leaving the clamped eyes open. I was nervous again. I remember a range of peculiar sensations; smelling something burnt, seeing grey rings changing shape whilst hearing the assistant’s voice ’20%, 40%, 60%…’. Each eye only takes a few seconds.
After 20 minutes I came out of the operating room feeling dizzy, although I could see immediately. My vision was blurry at first but after a day’s sleep and lot’s of painkillers I saw very well, 110% to be precise.

My Eyes
It was about four years ago that I underwent laser eye surgery. Firstly, I had my eyes checked at the ophthalmologist’s where I was told that I was suited to have the operation – it’s a common and simple procedure. Two weeks later I sat nervously in the small and tasteful waiting room of a Laser Institute nearby Lake Geneva. The Valium I was given took my anxiety away just in time before I was taken into the darkened operating theatre where a doctor and his assistant awaited me.
I laid down. The doctor began to put clamps on my eyes so that I was no longer able to close them. The clamps were quite uncomfortable although the pain faded soon after my eyes had been moistened with anesthetizing drops. In the first step the cornea is cut so that it can be flapped open. The doctor told me not to move my head and to look directly into the light. Its odd knowing that a machine is touching your eye. I couldn’t actually feel it but I remember experiencing beautiful visuals – panopticon-like circles changed shape and colour as the scalpel slid through my cornea. Afterwards, the bed rotated about the axis and over to the laser machine where the doctor covered my face with plastic, leaving the clamped eyes open. I was nervous again. I remember a range of peculiar sensations; smelling something burnt, seeing grey rings changing shape whilst hearing the assistant’s voice ’20%, 40%, 60%…’. Each eye only takes a few seconds.
After 20 minutes I came out of the operating room feeling dizzy, although I could see immediately. My vision was blurry at first but after a day’s sleep and lot’s of painkillers I saw very well, 110% to be precise.

28/11/2015

Oracle is open TODAY from 3 - 6pm.
Come by and see Flora Kleins 'My Eyes'!
X

Throughout life, I have been focused on questions of economic development – on global scale. In the early 1970s, when I ...
15/11/2015

Throughout life, I have been focused on questions of economic development – on global scale. In the early 1970s, when I was graduating from Carleton College, intending to go into urban or regional planning, or international relations, or possibly architecture in its broadest, most megastructural sense, I went through three discoveries.

(1) Ecology would be the dominant issue of my lifetime, notably in desertification, in wild habitat loss, in global warming, in urbanization, in monoculture. (2) Earth art and conceptual art, hot at the time, provided fresh new paradigms for river or ocean engineering. (3) The World Bank, where I had been set up by family connection for a job, was unaware of new art, and therefore unaware of the logic inherent in „Great Western Salt Works“ or even in the systems –drawings of Sol LeWitt, the rapid color sequencing of Paul Sharits, or the wild–animal scenarios of Joseph Beuys. Mustering my ideas for an application to MIT´s regional planning program, I wrote what became the kickoff essay of my career: “Agriculture Ends, Art Takes Over“. I descended into the art world, befriended Dennis Oppenheim, started working for Gordon Matta–Clark and Les Levine and within two years was exhibiting a story-board for earthworks on pan-global scale at Caltech´s Baxter Art Museum, in “Earth Net: An Economic System“ At Caltech, I made the first public exhibit of European Space Agency satellite imagery – even ahead of their official release date. The aim, throughout, was scientific authority with state-of–the–art monitoring technology. In those first years, to make money, I worked at the Fulton Fish Market.

In 1979, artist Taro Suzuki asked me to start an artists’ air force with him, and I rejoined with “Space Force“. Soon about ten artists were clustering together on cable TV shows with scenarios of global earth monitoring, for the public. I had been showing and working through Collaborative Projects, Inc. instead of the galleries, and from this spun off a six-person group attempting to reach real-world clients, called “The Offices of Fend, Fitzgibbon, Holzer, Nadin, Prince & Winters“. By this time, all my ideas in architecture, earthworks, offshore renewable-energy structures and even immediate corporal-envelopes had been developed or exhibited, along with my mapping oft he world according to its saltwater (regional sea) basins. The question was: with what legal instrument, what vehicle, shall these ideas be delivered to clients? A lawyer read about me in New York Magazine, regarding adventures at the Fulton Fish Market; he visited “The Offices“ and he explained that it lacked a legal incorporation. That summer, amidst the Real Estate Show and Times Square Show, amidst the normal shift to individual-artist careerism experienced by my colleagues, I founded Ocean Earth Construction and Development Corporation.

The first big break for Ocean Earth came in 1982 – with a video exhibition of satellite imagery at The Kitchen, and an outdoor display of ocean basins as satellite monitored sponsored by ...The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. A Village Voice Arts lead ensued. Three months later, my colleagues in Ocean Earth and I working with that concept of Space Force, realized our fantasy of real–world penetration: we contracted with NBC and the BBC to produce satellite surveys oft the Falklands. The total sale was nearly $25,000, in one day: this was where I had wanted to be. Soon after, we contracted with CBS to cover Lebanon and Beirut. In both cases, however, we discovered that our rapid-spectral sequencing with civil data, based on structuralist film-making ideas of collaborator Paul Sharits, were leading to enormous intelligence findings. We could sift through colors to find grass runways, changing Israeli positions, supply lines – all the hard information of espionage, without using military data or military detail-scrutiny techniques. We were asked to cooperate with intelligence agencies; we refused; then began what I now see as a lifelong game.

The next five years were spent mostly outside the United States, with revenue almost entirely from satellite-imagery and analyses sales to nearly all TV companies and international press outlets worldwide. Given difficulties with releasing true stories on conventional media, I funneled data to a high official at the United Nations – until there, too, a scandal broke out. It turned out that this official was not sharing the UN – directed data, for example with Iraq. I exposed him in the International Herald Tribune, then LExpress and New Scientist, and several UN press conferences ensued. Also, more seriously perhaps, Iraq became aware that the UN had been acting wrongly. Dangerous events ensued and I was forced to abandon the business and re-enter the artworld: I joined American Fine Arts and began showing with curators like Collins & Milazzo, Fred Wagemans in Holland and Jerome Sans in France. At the outset, I showed scenarios for river and ecosystem developments throughout the Middle East, including the Persian Gulf. I wanted the tough experiences in high politics to be translated into proposals for earth-art based…(following pages not yet found)

Peter Fend

Throughout life, I have been focused on questions of economic development – on global scale. In the early 1970s, when I was graduating from Carleton College, intending to go into urban or regional planning, or international relations, or possibly architecture in its broadest, most megastructural sense, I went through three discoveries.

(1) Ecology would be the dominant issue of my lifetime, notably in desertification, in wild habitat loss, in global warming, in urbanization, in monoculture. (2) Earth art and conceptual art, hot at the time, provided fresh new paradigms for river or ocean engineering. (3) The World Bank, where I had been set up by family connection for a job, was unaware of new art, and therefore unaware of the logic inherent in „Great Western Salt Works“ or even in the systems –drawings of Sol LeWitt, the rapid color sequencing of Paul Sharits, or the wild–animal scenarios of Joseph Beuys. Mustering my ideas for an application to MIT´s regional planning program, I wrote what became the kickoff essay of my career: “Agriculture Ends, Art Takes Over“. I descended into the art world, befriended Dennis Oppenheim, started working for Gordon Matta–Clark and Les Levine and within two years was exhibiting a story-board for earthworks on pan-global scale at Caltech´s Baxter Art Museum, in “Earth Net: An Economic System“ At Caltech, I made the first public exhibit of European Space Agency satellite imagery – even ahead of their official release date. The aim, throughout, was scientific authority with state-of–the–art monitoring technology. In those first years, to make money, I worked at the Fulton Fish Market.

In 1979, artist Taro Suzuki asked me to start an artists’ air force with him, and I rejoined with “Space Force“. Soon about ten artists were clustering together on cable TV shows with scenarios of global earth monitoring, for the public. I had been showing and working through Collaborative Projects, Inc. instead of the galleries, and from this spun off a six-person group attempting to reach real-world clients, called “The Offices of Fend, Fitzgibbon, Holzer, Nadin, Prince & Winters“. By this time, all my ideas in architecture, earthworks, offshore renewable-energy structures and even immediate corporal-envelopes had been developed or exhibited, along with my mapping oft he world according to its saltwater (regional sea) basins. The question was: with what legal instrument, what vehicle, shall these ideas be delivered to clients? A lawyer read about me in New York Magazine, regarding adventures at the Fulton Fish Market; he visited “The Offices“ and he explained that it lacked a legal incorporation. That summer, amidst the Real Estate Show and Times Square Show, amidst the normal shift to individual-artist careerism experienced by my colleagues, I founded Ocean Earth Construction and Development Corporation.

The first big break for Ocean Earth came in 1982 – with a video exhibition of satellite imagery at The Kitchen, and an outdoor display of ocean basins as satellite monitored sponsored by ...The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. A Village Voice Arts lead ensued. Three months later, my colleagues in Ocean Earth and I working with that concept of Space Force, realized our fantasy of real–world penetration: we contracted with NBC and the BBC to produce satellite surveys oft the Falklands. The total sale was nearly $25,000, in one day: this was where I had wanted to be. Soon after, we contracted with CBS to cover Lebanon and Beirut. In both cases, however, we discovered that our rapid-spectral sequencing with civil data, based on structuralist film-making ideas of collaborator Paul Sharits, were leading to enormous intelligence findings. We could sift through colors to find grass runways, changing Israeli positions, supply lines – all the hard information of espionage, without using military data or military detail-scrutiny techniques. We were asked to cooperate with intelligence agencies; we refused; then began what I now see as a lifelong game.

The next five years were spent mostly outside the United States, with revenue almost entirely from satellite-imagery and analyses sales to nearly all TV companies and international press outlets worldwide. Given difficulties with releasing true stories on conventional media, I funneled data to a high official at the United Nations – until there, too, a scandal broke out. It turned out that this official was not sharing the UN – directed data, for example with Iraq. I exposed him in the International Herald Tribune, then LExpress and New Scientist, and several UN press conferences ensued. Also, more seriously perhaps, Iraq became aware that the UN had been acting wrongly. Dangerous events ensued and I was forced to abandon the business and re-enter the artworld: I joined American Fine Arts and began showing with curators like Collins & Milazzo, Fred Wagemans in Holland and Jerome Sans in France. At the outset, I showed scenarios for river and ecosystem developments throughout the Middle East, including the Persian Gulf. I wanted the tough experiences in high politics to be translated into proposals for earth-art based…(following pages not yet found)

Peter Fend

Adresse

Joachimsthaler Str 14
Berlin
10719

Benachrichtigungen

Lassen Sie sich von uns eine E-Mail senden und seien Sie der erste der Neuigkeiten und Aktionen von Oracle Berlin erfährt. Ihre E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht für andere Zwecke verwendet und Sie können sich jederzeit abmelden.

Service Kontaktieren

Nachricht an Oracle Berlin senden:

Kategorie

Kunst & Unterhaltung in der Nähe


Andere Kunstgalerie in Berlin

Alles Anzeigen