Art Mûr Berlin

Art Mûr Berlin Art Mûr Berlin opened in November 2017 and is the satellite space of Art Mûr Montreal (est. 1996).
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Art Mûr Berlin will open on November 16, 2017

January 22-26, 2020Judith BerryBooth P13London Art FairBusiness Design Centre52 Upper StreetLondon N1 0QH
09/01/2020

January 22-26, 2020
Judith Berry
Booth P13
London Art Fair
Business Design Centre
52 Upper Street
London N1 0QH

Dana WidawskiArtist’s Rest (I-III), 2014Unterglasur auf Keramikfliesen / Underglaze on ceramic tiles90 x 45 cm (jeder / ...
01/10/2019

Dana Widawski
Artist’s Rest (I-III), 2014
Unterglasur auf Keramikfliesen / Underglaze on ceramic tiles
90 x 45 cm (jeder / each)

Danke Anna Larkin und Exberliner!
01/10/2019

Danke Anna Larkin und Exberliner!

12. September – 19. Oktober 2019Eröffnungsempfang: Freitag, 13. September 2019 von 19-21 Uhr.Greg Payce: Transfiguration
02/09/2019

12. September – 19. Oktober 2019
Eröffnungsempfang:
Freitag, 13. September 2019 von 19-21 Uhr.
Greg Payce: Transfiguration

Art Mûr
26/07/2019

Art Mûr

Du 18 juillet au 17 août 2019

23/07/2019

Art Mûr Berlin is open by appointment only this week. Thank you!

Julia Lia WalterMemories I., 2019Mixed Media auf Acrylfolie, Projektion/ mixed media on acrylic foil, projection100 x 11...
19/07/2019

Julia Lia Walter
Memories I., 2019
Mixed Media auf Acrylfolie, Projektion/ mixed media on acrylic foil, projection
100 x 115 x 25 cm (39.4 x 45.3 x 9 in)

Julia Lia Walter
13/07/2019

Julia Lia Walter

Adam GunnRuin Value, 2019Acryl auf Holzplatte / acrylic on wood panel69.5 x 135 cm (27.5 x 53 in)
25/04/2019

Adam Gunn
Ruin Value, 2019
Acryl auf Holzplatte / acrylic on wood panel
69.5 x 135 cm (27.5 x 53 in)

25. April – 15. Juni 2019Eröffnungsempfang: Donnerstag, 25. April 2019 von 17-19 Uhr.Adam Gunn: Island of the Dead---Apr...
22/04/2019

25. April – 15. Juni 2019
Eröffnungsempfang:
Donnerstag, 25. April 2019 von 17-19 Uhr.
Adam Gunn: Island of the Dead

---

April 25 – June 15, 2019
Opening reception:
Thursday, April 25, 2019 from 5-7 p.m.
Adam Gunn: Island of the Dead

We are very pleased to announce that Adam Gunn is our artist in residence in Berlin until June 15th.His studio space is ...
09/03/2019

We are very pleased to announce that Adam Gunn is our artist in residence in Berlin until June 15th.

His studio space is open to the public during regular hours, along side the solo exhibition from Karine Frechette (in collaboration with Galerie René Blouin) in the gallery.

Art Mûr Berlin Hessische Straße 9, 10115 Berlin, Germany

Art Mûr Berlin's cover photo
08/02/2019

Art Mûr Berlin's cover photo

Du 22 février au 6 avril 2019Karine Frechette : Wakes (Sillages)En collaboration avec galerie René Blouin
05/02/2019

Du 22 février au 6 avril 2019
Karine Frechette : Wakes (Sillages)
En collaboration avec galerie René Blouin

Kanada Kultur
29/09/2018

Kanada Kultur

Canadian artists at Art Berlin Fair: Kapwani Kiwanga at Galerie Tanja Wagner, Jeremy Shaw at König Galerie and represented at Christopher Cutts Gallery and Art Mûr Berlin at Positions Berlin Art Fair - Go See!

Art-agenda
29/09/2018
Art-agenda

Art-agenda

Nadia Myre: "Code Switching and Other Work" at Art Mûr Berlin

#ArtMûr #NadiaMyre #MotherTongue

September 25–November 10, 2018
Opening: September 28, 6–9pm, during Berlin Art Week

In the context of Berlin Art Week, Art Mûr Berlin is delighted to present Nadia Myre’s "Code Switching and Other Work," an exhibition first presented by Mother Tongue during Glasgow International 2018.

"Code-Switching and Other New Work" is a solo presentation of new and existing work from Montreal-based artist Nadia Myre, curated by the Glasgow-based curatorial duo Mother Tongue (Tiffany Boyle and Jessica Carden). Responding to the history of clay tobacco pipe production in London and Glasgow, Myre’s work poetically unearths the entanglement between the British Empire, Canada and Indigenous peoples. A by-product of the tobacco trade with the so-called New World, the pipes were one of the first ‘disposable’ items to enter the market, purchased pre-stuffed with tobacco. Myre’s new work explore processes of imprinting, documenting, weaving and excavating to ask enduring questions around colonial legacies.

European contact with the New World in the 1600s led to an upsurge in tobacco use and to the design of clay tobacco pipes in Britain, a revisal of the vessels used by indigenous peoples with a bowl and elongated stem. The clay pipe was incrementally broken off in segments as the tobacco was smoked. There were a number of production hubs for these across the UK, including Glasgow and Bristol. Scotland’s production had a special monopoly on exporting in large volume to conglomerates such as the Hudson Bay Company, which historically ruled de facto large parts of North America during early colonial settlement. Tobacco pipe shards are significant in archaeological terms, used to date sites during excavations, where they can be found in volume. Excavated shards are therefore at once special items of historical significance, yet also everyday in their number, seemingly simple appearance can carry little economic value.

Nadia Myre is a visual artist from Quebec and an Algonquin member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation. In 2015, she began research excavations along the banks of the Thames, uncovering bowls and stems of clay tobacco pipes. In this process, bone and teeth have sometimes been initially mistaken for clay pipe stems and fragments, a telling undertone surrounding the life stories of these items. Equally, the shards in their ready-made, bead like form, recall the wampum used by First Nations people historically and in Myre’s present in weaving.

"Code-Switching and Other Work" is a pertinent body of work, through which the artist engages her audience in questioning how our shared pasts inform present understandings of one another. Initiating timely discussions regarding Indigenous rights and futures, Myre explores Indigenous and European ceramics using high-resolution scanning, photography and sculpture in a museum-style presentation format. Myre’s research and work focuses on cross-cultural experiences and mediations as a strategy towards recognizing and reclaiming the contributions of Indigenous arts and cultural practices. Equally, "Code-Switching and Other Work" examines the language and power of museum display formats and resulting knowledge production, and features historical objects that are reclaimed through re-creation and representation. In wider terms, the artist’s practice asks important questions around the role of craft within a visual arts practice, pushing the boundaries of how craft is understood and positioned.

"Mother Tongue," Tiffany Boyle & Jessica Carden

Thanks to Angela Hohmann from Tagesspiegel for her mention of Nicholas Crombach in her review of Positions Berlin Art Fa...
29/09/2018
Auf der Jagd | Der Tagesspiegel

Thanks to Angela Hohmann from Tagesspiegel for her mention of Nicholas Crombach in her review of Positions Berlin Art Fair

https://www.pressreader.com/germany/der-tagesspiegel/20180929/282235191591094

In un­mit­tel­ba­rer Nach­bar­schaft zur Art Ber­lin hat die Po­si­ti­ons ih­re Pfor­ten in Han­gar 4 des ehe­ma­li­gen Flug­ha­fens Tem­pel­hof ge­öff­net. Dass die Mes­se in die­sem Jahr über­haupt statt­fin­det, grenzt an ein Wun­der. Denn die Art Ber­lin hat­te de...

Nadia Myre: Code Switching and Other Work begins tomorrow. Join us on Friday from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. for the opening!
24/09/2018
Art-agenda

Nadia Myre: Code Switching and Other Work begins tomorrow. Join us on Friday from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. for the opening!

Nadia Myre: "Code Switching and Other Work" at Art Mûr Berlin

#ArtMûr #NadiaMyre #MotherTongue

September 25–November 10, 2018
Opening: September 28, 6–9pm, during Berlin Art Week

In the context of Berlin Art Week, Art Mûr Berlin is delighted to present Nadia Myre’s "Code Switching and Other Work," an exhibition first presented by Mother Tongue during Glasgow International 2018.

"Code-Switching and Other New Work" is a solo presentation of new and existing work from Montreal-based artist Nadia Myre, curated by the Glasgow-based curatorial duo Mother Tongue (Tiffany Boyle and Jessica Carden). Responding to the history of clay tobacco pipe production in London and Glasgow, Myre’s work poetically unearths the entanglement between the British Empire, Canada and Indigenous peoples. A by-product of the tobacco trade with the so-called New World, the pipes were one of the first ‘disposable’ items to enter the market, purchased pre-stuffed with tobacco. Myre’s new work explore processes of imprinting, documenting, weaving and excavating to ask enduring questions around colonial legacies.

European contact with the New World in the 1600s led to an upsurge in tobacco use and to the design of clay tobacco pipes in Britain, a revisal of the vessels used by indigenous peoples with a bowl and elongated stem. The clay pipe was incrementally broken off in segments as the tobacco was smoked. There were a number of production hubs for these across the UK, including Glasgow and Bristol. Scotland’s production had a special monopoly on exporting in large volume to conglomerates such as the Hudson Bay Company, which historically ruled de facto large parts of North America during early colonial settlement. Tobacco pipe shards are significant in archaeological terms, used to date sites during excavations, where they can be found in volume. Excavated shards are therefore at once special items of historical significance, yet also everyday in their number, seemingly simple appearance can carry little economic value.

Nadia Myre is a visual artist from Quebec and an Algonquin member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation. In 2015, she began research excavations along the banks of the Thames, uncovering bowls and stems of clay tobacco pipes. In this process, bone and teeth have sometimes been initially mistaken for clay pipe stems and fragments, a telling undertone surrounding the life stories of these items. Equally, the shards in their ready-made, bead like form, recall the wampum used by First Nations people historically and in Myre’s present in weaving.

"Code-Switching and Other Work" is a pertinent body of work, through which the artist engages her audience in questioning how our shared pasts inform present understandings of one another. Initiating timely discussions regarding Indigenous rights and futures, Myre explores Indigenous and European ceramics using high-resolution scanning, photography and sculpture in a museum-style presentation format. Myre’s research and work focuses on cross-cultural experiences and mediations as a strategy towards recognizing and reclaiming the contributions of Indigenous arts and cultural practices. Equally, "Code-Switching and Other Work" examines the language and power of museum display formats and resulting knowledge production, and features historical objects that are reclaimed through re-creation and representation. In wider terms, the artist’s practice asks important questions around the role of craft within a visual arts practice, pushing the boundaries of how craft is understood and positioned.

"Mother Tongue," Tiffany Boyle & Jessica Carden

Art-agenda
24/09/2018
Art-agenda

Art-agenda

Nadia Myre: "Code Switching and Other Work" at Art Mûr Berlin

#ArtMûr #NadiaMyre #MotherTongue

September 25–November 10, 2018
Opening: September 28, 6–9pm, during Berlin Art Week

In the context of Berlin Art Week, Art Mûr Berlin is delighted to present Nadia Myre’s "Code Switching and Other Work," an exhibition first presented by Mother Tongue during Glasgow International 2018.

"Code-Switching and Other New Work" is a solo presentation of new and existing work from Montreal-based artist Nadia Myre, curated by the Glasgow-based curatorial duo Mother Tongue (Tiffany Boyle and Jessica Carden). Responding to the history of clay tobacco pipe production in London and Glasgow, Myre’s work poetically unearths the entanglement between the British Empire, Canada and Indigenous peoples. A by-product of the tobacco trade with the so-called New World, the pipes were one of the first ‘disposable’ items to enter the market, purchased pre-stuffed with tobacco. Myre’s new work explore processes of imprinting, documenting, weaving and excavating to ask enduring questions around colonial legacies.

European contact with the New World in the 1600s led to an upsurge in tobacco use and to the design of clay tobacco pipes in Britain, a revisal of the vessels used by indigenous peoples with a bowl and elongated stem. The clay pipe was incrementally broken off in segments as the tobacco was smoked. There were a number of production hubs for these across the UK, including Glasgow and Bristol. Scotland’s production had a special monopoly on exporting in large volume to conglomerates such as the Hudson Bay Company, which historically ruled de facto large parts of North America during early colonial settlement. Tobacco pipe shards are significant in archaeological terms, used to date sites during excavations, where they can be found in volume. Excavated shards are therefore at once special items of historical significance, yet also everyday in their number, seemingly simple appearance can carry little economic value.

Nadia Myre is a visual artist from Quebec and an Algonquin member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation. In 2015, she began research excavations along the banks of the Thames, uncovering bowls and stems of clay tobacco pipes. In this process, bone and teeth have sometimes been initially mistaken for clay pipe stems and fragments, a telling undertone surrounding the life stories of these items. Equally, the shards in their ready-made, bead like form, recall the wampum used by First Nations people historically and in Myre’s present in weaving.

"Code-Switching and Other Work" is a pertinent body of work, through which the artist engages her audience in questioning how our shared pasts inform present understandings of one another. Initiating timely discussions regarding Indigenous rights and futures, Myre explores Indigenous and European ceramics using high-resolution scanning, photography and sculpture in a museum-style presentation format. Myre’s research and work focuses on cross-cultural experiences and mediations as a strategy towards recognizing and reclaiming the contributions of Indigenous arts and cultural practices. Equally, "Code-Switching and Other Work" examines the language and power of museum display formats and resulting knowledge production, and features historical objects that are reclaimed through re-creation and representation. In wider terms, the artist’s practice asks important questions around the role of craft within a visual arts practice, pushing the boundaries of how craft is understood and positioned.

"Mother Tongue," Tiffany Boyle & Jessica Carden

Add Nadia Myre: Code Switching and Other Work to your agenda next week during Berlin Art Week
22/09/2018

Add Nadia Myre: Code Switching and Other Work to your agenda next week during Berlin Art Week

Art Mûr Berlin is delighted to participate to Positions Berlin Art Fair next week during Berlin Art Week. Thanks to @MON...
19/09/2018

Art Mûr Berlin is delighted to participate to Positions Berlin Art Fair next week during Berlin Art Week. Thanks to @MONOPOL - Magazin für Kunst und Leben for the feature in their latest issue.

Photo: Karine Payette, Entre nous 1, 2016

Nadia Myre: Code Switching and Other WorkPresented during Glasgow International 2018photo by Ross Fraser McLean
19/09/2018

Nadia Myre: Code Switching and Other Work
Presented during Glasgow International 2018
photo by Ross Fraser McLean

Today is the last day of Nicholas Crombach 's exhibition The End of the Chase!
15/09/2018

Today is the last day of Nicholas Crombach 's exhibition The End of the Chase!

Edwin Janzen's review of Nicholas Crombach 's Behind Elegantly Carved Wooden Doors presented in #Montreal a few months a...
24/08/2018

Edwin Janzen's review of Nicholas Crombach 's Behind Elegantly Carved Wooden Doors presented in #Montreal a few months ago in Border Crossings Magazine. Catch Crombach's current exhibition in #Berlin until September 15!

Edwin Janzen reviews Nicholas Crombach, "Behind Elegantly Carved Wooden Doors", at Art Mûr in Montreal. #bc146

Nicholas Crombach, 'Survival of the Fittest', detail, 2016, polyurethane resin, paint, Houdon Ecorcheé reproduction, 30 x 41 x 76 cm. Image courtesy Art Mûr, Montreal.

http://bordercrossingsmag.com/ to subscribe.

#bordercrossingsmagazine #bordercrossingsmag #bccrossovers

Thank you Found Footage Magazine for mentioning Oli Sorenson's event at the gallery on August 17 & 18.All info here: htt...
09/08/2018

Thank you Found Footage Magazine for mentioning Oli Sorenson's event at the gallery on August 17 & 18.

All info here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/2009973579316129/

NO MORE HEROES
By Oli Sorenson
Art Mûr Berlin - Berlin (Germany)
August 17-18, 2018

Art Mûr Gallery in Berlin introduces a special screening of the "No More Heroes" series by the Canadian artist Oli Sorenson. With "No More Heroes", Sorenson makes a comment on Hollywood’s obsession with heroic figures by re-editing mainstream movies to cut out every frame in which the main character was seen or heard. On viewing the remaining footage that Sorenson put back together, the supporting characters are now perceived as main protagonists and a new story is imagined from the patched up dialogues. What were once canonical storylined feature shows now becomes a series of experimental short film.

The screenings will be punctuated with Q&A sessions in the presence of the artist.

More info: http://artmur.com/en/exhibitions/2018-exhibitions-berlin/no-more-heroes/

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Hessische Straße 9
Berlin
10115

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Mittwoch 11:00 - 18:00
Donnerstag 11:00 - 18:00
Freitag 11:00 - 18:00
Samstag 11:00 - 18:00

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